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Sep 30, 2016------News ArchiveLatest research covered daily, archived weekly

Meet the world's largest bony fish
For the first time, the genome of the ocean sunfish (Mola mola), the world's largest bony fish, has been sequenced. Researchers involved in the Genome 10K (G10K) project want to collect 10,000 nonmammalian vertebrate genomes for comparative analyses. The ocean sunfish genome has now revealed several altered genes that may explain its' fast growth, large size and unusual shape.

Sep 29, 2016------News ArchiveLatest research covered daily, archived weekly

Genetic variations that cause skull-fusion disorders
During the first year of life, the human brain doubles in size, continuing to grow through adolescence. But sometimes, the loosely connected plates of a baby's skull fuse too early, a disorder known as craniosynostosis. It can also produce facial and skull deformities, potentially damaging a young brain.

Sep 2
8, 2016------News ArchiveLatest research covered daily, archived weekly

Heart defect genes both inside and outside the heart
Congenital heart defects (CHDs) are a leading cause of birth defect-related deaths. How genetic alterations cause such defects is complicated by the fact that its many critical genes are unknown, and those that are known often contribute only small increases in CHD risk.

Sep 27, 2016------News ArchiveLatest research covered daily, archived weekly

Cesarean baby 15% more likely to become obese
Cesarean born babies are 15% more likely to become obese as children than individuals born by vaginal birth and 64% more likely to be obese than their siblings born by vaginal birth. The increased risk may persist through adulthood. All of this data is according to a large study from Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health.

Sep 26, 2016------News ArchiveLatest research covered daily, archived weekly

Male primes female for reproduction - but at a cost
Research has discovered that male worms, through an invisible chemical "essence," prime female worms for reproduction but with the unfortunate side effect of also hastening her aging. The results might lead to human therapies to delay puberty or prolong fertility.

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