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Welcome to The Visible Embryo, a comprehensive educational resource on human development from conception to birth.

The Visible Embryo provides visual references for changes in fetal development throughout pregnancy and can be navigated via fetal development or maternal changes.


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The World Health Organization (WHO) has created a new Web site to help researchers, doctors and patients obtain reliable information on high-quality clinical trials. Now you can go to one website and search all registers to identify clinical trial research underway around the world!



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Disclaimer: The Visible Embryo web site is provided for your general information only. The information contained on this site should not be treated as a substitute for medical, legal or other professional advice. Neither is The Visible Embryo responsible or liable for the contents of any websites of third parties which are listed on this site.


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Pregnancy Timeline by SemestersDevelopmental TimelineFertilizationFirst TrimesterSecond TrimesterThird TrimesterFirst Thin Layer of Skin AppearsEnd of Embryonic PeriodEnd of Embryonic PeriodFemale Reproductive SystemBeginning Cerebral HemispheresA Four Chambered HeartFirst Detectable Brain WavesThe Appearance of SomitesBasic Brain Structure in PlaceHeartbeat can be detectedHeartbeat can be detectedFinger and toe prints appearFinger and toe prints appearFetal sexual organs visibleBrown fat surrounds lymphatic systemBone marrow starts making blood cellsBone marrow starts making blood cellsInner Ear Bones HardenSensory brain waves begin to activateSensory brain waves begin to activateFetal liver is producing blood cellsBrain convolutions beginBrain convolutions beginImmune system beginningWhite fat begins to be madeHead may position into pelvisWhite fat begins to be madePeriod of rapid brain growthFull TermHead may position into pelvisImmune system beginningLungs begin to produce surfactant
CLICK ON weeks 0 - 40 and follow along every 2 weeks of fetal development




 

Jun 28 2017-----News ArchiveLatest research covered daily, archived weekly

A bird's eye view
We humans belong to a select club. Our species enjoys crisp color vision in daylight. All because of a very small spot in the center of the retina at the back of each of our eyes. Other species in this club are apes, monkeys, numerous fish, reptiles — and many birds, as they must be able to see dinner scurrying far below, or tiny seeds right up close.


Jun 27 2017-----News ArchiveLatest research covered daily, archived weekly

Genes, ozone, and autism
A new analysis shows that individuals with high levels of genetic variation and increased exposure to environmentalo zone, are at an even higher risk for developing autism than expected simply by adding the two risk factors together.


Jun 26 2017-----News ArchiveLatest research covered daily, archived weekly

Uterine fluid tells fetus about mom's world
Recent evidence suggests uterine fluid may play another role in embryonic development — preparing fetus for mother's outside world.

Jun 23 2017-----News ArchiveLatest research covered daily, archived weekly

New clues linking pre-eclampsia and cholesterol
A dangerous link appears to exist between the complications of pre-eclampsia and an increased risk for heart disease in later life — in both mother and child.

Jun 22 2017-----News ArchiveLatest research covered daily, archived weekly

Babies' DNA affects mothers' risk for pre-eclampsia" target
A major new international study has revealed for the first time that some features in a baby's DNA can increase the risk of its mother developing pre-eclampsia — a potentially dangerous condition in pregnancy.

Jun 21 2017-----News ArchiveLatest research covered daily, archived weekly

Elegant switch controls transition from egg to embryo
Transition from an egg into an embryo is one of life's most remarkable transformations. Yet how? Researchers have now deciphered one aspect of that change, when an embryo begins changing messenger RNA (mRNA) into proteins. The egg automatically triggers to shut off the process after 20 to 90 minutes.

Jun 20 2017-----News ArchiveLatest research covered daily, archived weekly

Time and space in brain development and disease
Transition from an egg into an embryo is one of life's most remarkable transformations. Yet how? Researchers have now deciphered one aspect of that change, when an embryo begins changing messenger RNA (mRNA) into proteins. The egg automatically triggers to shut off the process after 20 to 90 minutes.

Jun 19 2017-----News ArchiveLatest research covered daily, archived weekly

Meditation/yoga 'reverse' DNA reactions causing stress
Mind-body interventions (MBIs) such as meditation, yoga and Tai Chi don't simply relax us — they can 'reverse' the molecular reactions in our DNA which cause ill-health and depression. According to a study by the universities of Coventry and Radboud.

Jun 16 2017-----News ArchiveLatest research covered daily, archived weekly

Child leukemias are mistakes in DNA rearrangement
Certain pediatric leukemias share a common underlying cause with those leukemias induced as a result of therapeutic treatment — referred to as 'treatment-related secondary leukemias.' Both diseases involve translocations in the KMT2A gene.

Jun 15 2017-----News ArchiveLatest research covered daily, archived weekly

LRP4 molecule critical to synapse
A receptor molecule involved in creating the excitatory synaptic junction offers a new way to examine how the brain forms. And perhaps a way to modify brain confusion.

Jun 14 2017-----News ArchiveLatest research covered daily, archived weekly

A fathers' age & lifestyle associated with birth defects
Increasingly, research is showing an association between birth defects and a father's age, his alcohol use and other environmental factors, say researchers at Georgetown University Medical Center. These defects result from epigenetic (or 'outside of the genome') alterations that can potentially affect continuing generations.

Jun 13 2017-----News ArchiveLatest research covered daily, archived weekly

3D skin fixes backbone birth defect in rat pups
Myelomeningocele is a severe congenital defect in which the backbone and spinal canal do not close before birth, putting affected babies at risk for lifelong neurologic problems. In a preclinical study, researchers developed a stem cell-based therapy for generating skin grafts to cover myelomeningocele defects before birth. They first generated artificial skin from human induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs), and then successfully transplanted the skin grafts into rat fetuses with myelomeningocele.

Jun 12 2017-----News ArchiveLatest research covered daily, archived weekly

How cells divide tasks and conquer work
Mind-body interventions (MBIs) such as meditation, yoga and Tai Chi don't simply relax us — they can 'reverse' the molecular reactions in our DNA which cause ill-health and depression. According to a study by the universities of Coventry and Radboud.

Jun 9 2017-----News ArchiveLatest research covered daily, archived weekly

Gene cross-talk is key to a cell's balance
Competing regulatory genes "talk" to each other to maintain balance between cell states, according to research from Stowers Institute for Medical Research.

Jun 8 2017-----News ArchiveLatest research covered daily, archived weekly

But for the hair of a fly...
Things couldn't be simpler at the beginning of life: a cell divides into two identical cells, that then divide again. This means any cell can grow at an exponential rate. But a moment comes when some of these cells must develop into specialized cells to create tissues with complicated functions to support a complex organism such as a fly, a fish, or a human. On the back of a fly, for example, a cell must "know" to split, so it can become two fundamentally different cells: one a hair cell — the other a nerve cell.

Jun 7 2017-----News ArchiveLatest research covered daily, archived weekly

Gene therapy could 'turn off' severe allergies
A single treatment giving life-long protection from severe allergies such as asthma could be made possible by immunology research at The University of Queensland.

Jun 6 2017-----News ArchiveLatest research covered daily, archived weekly

Mice reveal role of human brown fat
When it gets cold, your body turns up the heat to maintain a stable temperature. That heat is produced by brown adipose tissue, or brown fat, which also affects how our body uses glucose. But scientists don't completely understand this interaction. In part, this is the result of not having an animal model with similar brown fat. Now, a discovery that mice also have brown fat deposits similar to those found in people, is revealing more on how temperature regulation works.

Jun 5 2017-----News ArchiveLatest research covered daily, archived weekly

The machinery of memory
Understanding how memories are made, retrieved, and eventually fade over a lifetime is the stuff of poems and song. To medical research, solving the mysteries of memory is even more elusive.

Jun 1 2017-----News ArchiveLatest research covered daily, archived weekly

Baby teeth link autism and heavy metals
Baby teeth from children with autism contain more toxic lead and less of the essential nutrients zinc and manganese, compared to teeth from children without autism, according to an innovative study funded by the National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences (NIEHS), part of the National Institutes of Health.

May 31 2017-----News ArchiveLatest research covered daily, archived weekly

TET1 protein, congenital defects and late-onset diseases
In the earliest stages of embryo development, a protein known as TET1 may be the factor that tips the balance toward health or disease. The first evidence for this vital role of TET1 is presented by researchers from the University of Leuven, Belgium, who found TET1 prevents congenital defects such as spina bifida as well as mental retardation and cancer later in life.

May 30 2017-----News ArchiveLatest research covered daily, archived weekly

Answers for kids with inherited kidney disease
A new gene behind a rare form of inherited childhood kidney disease has been identified by a global research team. University of Queensland was part of the team that made the discovery to improve genetic testing and provide clues for future treatments of autosomal recessive polycystic kidney disease (ARPKD).

May 29 2017-----News ArchiveLatest research covered daily, archived weekly

A key gene contributes to common birth defects
Human chromosome 22 is a hotspot for a variety of birth defects. Scientists learned about the 22q11.2 region of chromosome 22 because it is deleted in about 1 in 4,000 births, causing loss or duplication in up to 40 genes. Chromosome micro-deletion or micro-duplication can result in a number of developmental abnormalities which can vary greatly in severity./p>

May 26 2017-----News ArchiveLatest research covered daily, archived weekly

Preterm infant lung disease may be predictable
Tests of cells collected from the umbilical cord blood walls at birth can predict poor pulmonary outcomes or even death in extremely preterm infants, say researchers at the University of Alabama at Birmingham.

May 25 2017-----News ArchiveLatest research covered daily, archived weekly

Regeneration and how blood vessels are built
Knowing how human blood vessels are constructed is desperately needed to advance regenerative medicine. Collaborative research is helping identify the histone code which affects how a gene is read/transcribed, and the changes that occur over time as stem cells differentiate into blood vessels. One blood vessel group (ETS/GATA/SOX) has a previously unknown role.

May 24 2017-----News ArchiveLatest research covered daily, archived weekly

Putting the brakes on cancer
Cancer is an extremely complex disease, but its definition is quite simple — it is the abnormal and uncontrollable growth of cells. Researchers from the University of Rochester's Center for RNA Biology have identified a new way to potentially slow the fast-growing cells which characterize all types of cancer.

May 23 2017-----News ArchiveLatest research covered daily, archived weekly

Sleep apnea may increase pregnancy complications
Women with obstructive sleep apnea are at greater risk for serious pregnancy complications, longer hospital stays and even admission to the Intensive Care Unit more often than mothers without apnea, as presented in a paper before the American Thoracic Society 2017 International Conference of more than 1.5 million pregnancies.

May 22 2017-----News ArchiveLatest research covered daily, archived weekly

Zika could be a factor in more pregnancies
Researchers at the University of Wisconsin-Madison infected four pregnant rhesus macaque monkeys at the Wisconsin National Primate Research Center with a Zika viral dose similar to that transferred by a mosquito bite, ending with the virus being present in each fetus.

May 19 2017-----News ArchiveLatest research covered daily, archived weekly

Unlocking key to infertility in older women
Female fertility declines rapidly after the age of 37. Women over 42 have only a five per cent chance of having a baby without fertility treatment. New research may finally answer why older women have higher numbers of miscarriages and babies with chromosomal abnormalities.

May 18 2017-----News ArchiveLatest research covered daily, archived weekly

A body's guiding light
A light-sensitive receptor protein in the central brain regulates our circadian rhythms. Biologists discover the unexpected role of a light-sensitive receptor protein in the central brain that regulates circadian rhythms.

May 17 2017-----News ArchiveLatest research covered daily, archived weekly

Folk medicines that block fertilization
Chemicals in folk medicines can block sperm's power kick, that surge of energy needed to break through the cell wall of an egg. They may even provide a new type of emergency contraceptive.

May 16 2017-----News ArchiveLatest research covered daily, archived weekly

Natural selection against genetic damage — ongoing
The survival of the human species in the face of high rates of genetic mutation is an important problem. While mutations provide a source of novelty for our species, a large fraction of these genetic changes are also damaged.

May 15 2017-----News ArchiveLatest research covered daily, archived weekly

Male/female brain reacts differently to cardiac stress
A new study finds that heart related diseases may need to be diagnosed and treated by gender. The new study from the UCLA School of Nursing, identifies a region of the brain that helps manage stress, heart rate and blood pressure — but, reacts differently between men and women.

May 12 2017-----News ArchiveLatest research covered daily, archived weekly

Why does nature rely on sex for reproduction?
Why is sex so popular among plants and animals, when cloning is a more common strategy?

May 11 2017-----News ArchiveLatest research covered daily, archived weekly

CRISPR enzymes might also diagnose disease
University of California, Berkeley, research describes 10 new CRISPR enzymes that when activated, act like Pac-Man chewing up RNA and detecting infectious viruses.

May 10 2017-----News ArchiveLatest research covered daily, archived weekly

How epigenetic changes in DNA can be good or bad
Swedish scientists can now explain how some 'master' proteins activate regions of our genes which are normally not active, all as a result of epigenetic changes. This information gives us a better idea of what regulates genes in embryo development and even diseases such as cancer.

May 9 2017-----News ArchiveLatest research covered daily, archived weekly

First synthetic retina for visually impaired
A synthetic, soft tissue retina was just developed by an Oxford University student that could offer fresh hope for degenerative eye conditions such as retinitis pigmentosa.

May 8 2017-----News ArchiveLatest research covered daily, archived weekly

Zika antibody offers hope for a vaccine
A research team based at Rockefeller University has found a potent new weapon against Zika virus from the blood of infected people. The discovery may lead to new ways to fight the disease — even a vaccine.

May 5 2017-----News ArchiveLatest research covered daily, archived weekly

New tool is a roadmap of cell development
Researchers at Columbia University Medical Center created a new tool to map the many possible ways a cell can develop. Using the mathematics of topology, they now have a detailed roadmap of how stem cells become specialized into tissues.

May 4 2017-----News ArchiveLatest research covered daily, archived weekly

Enzyme could help fight against mid-life obesity
A team from the National Institutes of Health has identified an enzyme working against us in the battle over mid-life obesity and loss of fitness. The discovery in mice could change current ideas of why we gain weight as we age. It might also influence pregnancy attempts for mid-life women.

May 3 2017-----News ArchiveLatest research covered daily, archived weekly

Stem cells help identify causes for Angelman's
Researchers used stem cells from patients with Angelman syndrome to identify what cellular defects cause this rare neurogenetic disorder. This important step aids ongoing research looking for a possible cure and treatments now.

May 2 2017-----News ArchiveLatest research covered daily, archived weekly

How the HUWE1 protein impacts human intelligence
Brains need just the right balance of "on" and "calm down" signals to produce intellect. Now, scientists show how the HUWE1 protein helps balance nerve cell communication.

May 1 2017-----News ArchiveLatest research covered daily, archived weekly

Human umbilical blood rejuvenates old mice brains
Human umbilical cord blood can rejuvenate learning and memory in older mice, according to a study at the Stanford University School of Medicine. TIMP2 is a protein abundant in cord blood, but decreases with advancing age. Cord blood injected into older mice improved their memory performace.

Apr 28 2017-----News ArchiveLatest research covered daily, archived weekly

Mouse teeth give insight into tissue regeneration
Researchers hope to one day use stem cells to heal burns, patch damaged heart tissue, even grow kidneys and other transplantable organs from scratch. This dream edges closer to reality every year — and now, basic research has information from the front teeth of mice that helps.

Apr 27 2017-----News ArchiveLatest research covered daily, archived weekly

Can we now turn off allergy-sensitive cells?
Research suggests blocking transcription factors from turning genes "on" helps aleviate severe lung reactions. RCM-1 is a newly developed, nontoxic small molecule that stops mucus production in mice exposed to allergens.

Apr 26 2017-----News ArchiveLatest research covered daily, archived weekly

Fertility can hinge on sperm swimming conditions
Female enzymes are specific to each woman in quality, quantity and function. New research finds a woman's enzymes in utero can improve sperm's ability to swim through the uterus and up a fallopian tube on the way to an egg. Every mammal's sperm must make this swim, and the easier the swim, the better the chance for success.

Apr 25 2017-----News ArchiveLatest research covered daily, archived weekly

Neurons live long life in the gut of adult mice
Contrary to dogma, new evidence supports how a healthy adult mouse can regenerate a third of its gut nerve cells every week. This refutes a long-held scientific belief that the number of gut nerve cells from birth to death are the same — which may be true for human gut neurons as well.

Apr 24 2017-----News ArchiveLatest research covered daily, archived weekly

Which facial features are most controlled by genetics?
Research published this month uses computer image and statistical shape analysis to identify which parts of the face are most likely to be inherited.

Apr 21 2017-----News ArchiveLatest research covered daily, archived weekly

Do you speak 'Terpene'?
Micro-organisms communicate with each other, as well as the rest of the world, through scent. If you're small, smells are a good way to stand out from the crowd. Now, research has found that two different types of micro-organisms, bacteria and fungi, use fragrance known as terpenes, to converse.

Apr 20 2017-----News ArchiveLatest research covered daily, archived weekly

Secrets of menstrual cycle and early pregnancy
University of Cambridge scientists succeed in growing miniature functioning models of uterine lining in culture. These organoids, as they are called, could provide new insights into early stages of pregnancy and conditions like endometriosis — a painful overgrowth of the uterine lining affecting almost two million women in the UK alone.

Apr 19 2017-----News ArchiveLatest research covered daily, archived weekly

Sensory cells give hope to restoring hearing
In a first, investigators at St. Jude Children's Research Hospital can genetically manipulate auditory hair cells to regenerate in mice. This marks an advance which may lead to treatment of hearing loss in humans.

Apr 18 2017-----News ArchiveLatest research covered daily, archived weekly

'Lab on a chip' may reduce preterm births
In the United States, one half million babies are born preterm. Worldwide, the number is estimated at 15 million. Complications associated with preterm birth are the number one cause of death for children under 5. Survivors often face a range of continuing health problems.

Apr 17 2017-----News ArchiveLatest research covered daily, archived weekly

Game helps us understand animal camouflage
Computer games played by more than 30,000 people helped scientists understand animal camouflage and color vision.

Apr 14 2017-----News ArchiveLatest research covered daily, archived weekly

Fighting malaria with math
A mathematic model of the deadliest malaria parasite, Plasmodium falciparum, could help science develop drugs to wipe out its' existence in the mosquito.

Apr 13 2017-----News ArchiveLatest research covered daily, archived weekly

Multitasking secrets of RNA-binding
There are hundreds of RNA-binding proteins in an entire human genome. They regulate turnover and fix in place many thousands of RNA molecules within cells, and they are crucial to maintaining normal cell function. Any defects in RNA-binding proteins can lead to disease.

Apr 12 2017-----News ArchiveLatest research covered daily, archived weekly

Progesterone and bisexuality: Is there a link?
Giving progesterone to prevent miscarriage can influence a baby's sexual orientation. Bisexuality is quite common among men and women whose mothers received added doses of progesterone to prevent miscarriage.

Apr 11 2017-----News ArchiveLatest research covered daily, archived weekly

Low birth weight babies near coal-fired power plant
From 1990 through 2006 about 25% of mothers living as far as 20 to 30 miles from a notorious power plant known to give off sulfur dioxide, delivered babies below 6 pounds.

Apr 10 2017-----News ArchiveLatest research covered daily, archived weekly

Bad diet in pregnancy 'programs' bad health later
Pregnant and eating a high fat, high sugar diet leads to damaging changes in mom and baby. It may even lead to health complications being "programmed" in both later.

Apr 7 2017-----News ArchiveLatest research covered daily, archived weekly

Stem cells from pee?
A way to generate stem cells has been found using pee! Stem cells isolated from human urine appear to be more stable than skin stem cells, and cells from urine can also generate countless other cell lines. Urine collection is a non-invasive way to get stem cells from Down syndrome and other vulnerable patient populations, and may become a new and sound way to study human disease.

Apr 6 2017-----News ArchiveLatest research covered daily, archived weekly

Mouse dad's diet affects his pups' mental health
Evidence is accumulating, at least in animals, that infant development is affected not only by a mother's diet and lifestyle, but also by a father's diet prior to conception.

Apr 5 2017-----News ArchiveLatest research covered daily, archived weekly

Earliest embryonic stem cells identified
Researchers have identified cell surface markers specific to the very earliest stem cells in a human embryo. These cells are believed to have the greatest potential in replacing damaged tissue. But until now, early stem cells have been difficult to distinguish from classic embryonic stem cells.

Apr 4 2017-----News ArchiveLatest research covered daily, archived weekly

Why female fertility declines with age
Female infertility in aging mothers may be due to a defect in chromosome sharing during cell division — before eggs are fertilized. Women's eggs lie dormant in ovaries until release of one egg per menstrual cycle. But, fertility declines significantly in women around the age of 35.

Apr 3 2017-----News ArchiveLatest research covered daily, archived weekly

Older mothers are better mothers
Children of older moms tend to have fewer behavioral, social and emotional difficulties with their children. This may be because older moms, who are well aware of their declining fertility and the risks posed by either pregnancy or birth, are much more attendant on.

Mar 31 2017-----News ArchiveLatest research covered daily, archived weekly

How to calculate an immune response
Using patient gene data, Dartmouth team quickly calculates personal immune response profiles for thousands of patients.

Mar 30 2017-----News ArchiveLatest research covered daily, archived weekly

Stop eating! You are full!
Research has identified in flies, a molecule sent by fat cells to the fly brain to say the fly has eaten enough and to stop feeding. Because fruit flies replicate many of our human feeding-related mechanisms, as well as genes, they are a good model in finding out about our own bodies.

Mar 29 2017-----News ArchiveLatest research covered daily, archived weekly

Sperm tails are "motorized" and need all their parts

The beat of a sperm tail is generated by a motor — a molecular motor. Each motor produces a force to power a sperm's journey to the egg. Research now shows us how each motor is powered and how it moves a sperm tail.

Mar 28 2017-----News ArchiveLatest research covered daily, archived weekly

A link science didn't catch
An unexpected immune interaction is probably sabotaging vaccines designed to treat cancer. A part of the body thought disconnected from the immune system actually interacts with it, and may explain some male infertility and certain autoimmune diseases.

Mar 27 2017-----News ArchiveLatest research covered daily, archived weekly

A giant leap forward to pill for anti-aging
Researchers make a discovery that could lead to a revolutionary drug that actually reverses ageing, improves DNA repair and even help NASA get its astronauts to Mars.

Mar 24 2017-----News ArchiveLatest research covered daily, archived weekly

A 'three-hit' theory of autism
Since the first case was documented in the United States in 1938, finding causes for autism have remained elusive. Hundreds of genes and environmental exposures have been implicated. But, sex also seems to have something to do with it. About 80 percent of children diagnosed with an autism spectrum disorder are boys.

Mar 23 2017-----News ArchiveLatest research covered daily, archived weekly

Defect in non-coding DNA can impair language
The human genome is made up of approximately 3 billion letters of DNA. Each 'letter' can also become reorganized, and therefore be a variant of the norm. Some variants are harmless but others can be detrimental. It's a mammoth task to find out which variant causes a particular disorder.

Mar 22 2017-----News ArchiveLatest research covered daily, archived weekly

Gene mutation may explain female infertility
Researchers at Baylor College of Medicine, Texas Children's Hospital and Rice University have uncovered a gene mutation that may provide answers to unexplained female infertility.

Mar 21 2017-----News ArchiveLatest research covered daily, archived weekly

Potential clinical test and treatment for preterm birth
A molecule has been identified that drives inflammation. It may answer a key question about what causes mild prenatal infections that trigger preterm birth — and a potential way to suppress that response.

Mar 20 2017-----News ArchiveLatest research covered daily, archived weekly

Male infertility may be due to failure of calcium signal
A key protein in sperm causing some men to be infertile, appears to be phospholipase C zeta or PLC-zeta. When PLC-zeta is ineffective due to poor volume or a mutation, sperm fail to initiate calcium signalling and egg development. The discovery could enable early diagnosis and treatment.

Mar 17 2017-----News ArchiveLatest research covered daily, archived weekly

Can we stop neurons signaling their own death?
For over 150 years, it was believed axons die independently when injured by stroke, brain injury, or disease. A new study challenges this idea, suggesting axons coordinate their own destruction. Knowing this, a drug may be able to block axons from receiving the signal to degenerate. Then damage to healthy cells could be slowed or stopped.

Mar 16 2017-----News ArchiveLatest research covered daily, archived weekly

GABA may be key to regenerating human retinas
If you were a fish and your retina was damaged, it could repair itself and your vision would be restored in a few weeks. Sadly, human eyes don't have this ability — yet.

Mar 15 2017-----News ArchiveLatest research covered daily, archived weekly

Will mammals ever be able to regenerate tissues?
Regeneration differs across species. Fish and amphibians re-grow appendages such as limbs, tails, and fins. But mammals, including humans, cannot restore injured organs. Finding out what molecular mechanisms underlie the regeneration of lower vertebrates may help us restore complex organs in humans, a clinical goal of the future.

Mar 14 2017-----News ArchiveLatest research covered daily, archived weekly

What is a "brain organoid" and why do we need it?
Researchers have already grown "cerebral organoids" in labs — clusters of cells that self-organize into small brain-like structures called "brain organoids." Now "forebrain" centers in these clusters of cells seem to be recreating neuron timing and differentiation just like cells in an actual brain.

Mar 13 2017-----News ArchiveLatest research covered daily, archived weekly

A mouse 'embryo' made from stem cells
Scientists at the University of Cambridge, UK have managed to create a structure resembling a mouse embryo in a dish. They used two types of stem cells — the body's 'master cells' — and a 3D scaffold on which to grow them.

Mar 10 2017-----News ArchiveLatest research covered daily, archived weekly

Why staph, a common bacteria, induces severe illness
As much as we try to avoid it, ­we constantly share germs with those around us. But, even when two people have the same infection, their response can be dramatically different — mild for one, severe or life-threatening for another.

Mar 9 2017-----News ArchiveLatest research covered daily, archived weekly

A gene that makes the sexes look different
A "master gene" regulates physical differences between males and females.

Mar 8 2017
-----News ArchiveLatest research covered daily, archived weekly

Cell fusion proteins link sex and viruses
Sexual reproduction and viral infections actually have a lot in common. New research points out how both processes rely on a single protein, Armc5, to enable fusion between any two cell walls. For example: the fusion of a virus to a cell wall, or the fusion of a sperm cell to an egg cell.

Mar 7 2017-----News ArchiveLatest research covered daily, archived weekly

Can math predict our growth and diseases?
A biologist and mathematician are studying mathematics in biology. Their goal is to recreate the mathematics behind the "emergence of function" within a cell. They want to give biologists algorithms for cell division in development, and possibly, how to predict when it will go wrong in cancers.

Mar 6 2017-----News ArchiveLatest research covered daily, archived weekly

A gene that reinforces maternal attachment?
A particular variation in the serotonin gene SLC6A4, makes some children four times more likely to strongly attach to their mothers. The observation was made following a mentoring program for their mothers to improve mom's own attachment behaviors.

Mar 3 2017-----News ArchiveLatest research covered daily, archived weekly

50+ year old protein paradox solved
Proteins make life possible. They are the products made from all of our DNA programming. Now, researchers can accurately predict how changes in protein volume changes their folding and unfolding — making them more or less affective. As proteins may even be evolving below oceans on ice-bound exo-planets orbiting stars that are not our Sun, knowing how proteins work is not only critical for life as we live now, but might also impact our future in space.

Mar 2 2017-----News ArchiveLatest research covered daily, archived weekly

Daylight savings can increase IVF miscarriages
According to new research out of Boston Medical Center (BMC) and IVF New England, daylight savings time (DST) contributes to higher miscarriage rates among women undergoing in vitro fertilization (IVF) — but only in those who also had a prior pregnancy loss.

Mar 1 2017-----News ArchiveLatest research covered daily, archived weekly

Listeria may be a serious miscarriage threat
Listeria is a common food-borne bacterium that may be a greater risk for miscarriage in early pregnancy than thought.

Feb 28 2017-----News ArchiveLatest research covered daily, archived weekly

Neurons can choose to activate mom or dad's genes
For over a century, scientists have thought most of our cells use genes from both parents' pretty equally throughout life. But our biology is more nuanced, say scientists who invented a screen to measure specific genes from each parent.

Feb 27 2017-----News ArchiveLatest research covered daily, archived weekly

Can damage of dementia and Alzheimer's be undone?
A recent study suggests a possible treatment for Alzheimer's disease and other neurodegenerative disorders. Based on research on both mice and monkeys, some brain injuries caused by the toxic accumulation of tau protein, were prevented and even reversed.

Feb 24 2017-----News ArchiveLatest research covered daily, archived weekly

Unexpected influence on how stem cells divide
Most cells divide by simple division into 2 identical cells, mitosis. But, stem cells have options. They can regenerate themselves through mitotic division — or differentiate one daughter cell into virtually any specialized cell. However, this only can happen if mini-organs — peroxisomes — are distributed evenly throughout the stem cell.

Feb 23 2017-----News ArchiveLatest research covered daily, archived weekly

How to normalise synapses in autism & schizophrenia
Targeted drug therapies during adolescence may be used to normalize synapse number in the brains of those with Autism and Schizophrenia who have abnormal numbers of synapses.

Feb 22 2017-----News ArchiveLatest research covered daily, archived weekly

Autism biomarkers found in infants
Using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) to study brains of infant siblings of older children with autism, scientists were able to correctly identify 80 percent of babies who subsequently were diagnosed with autism at 2 years of age.

Feb 21 2017-----News ArchiveLatest research covered daily, archived weekly

Gene 'switch' clues us to origins of fine motor skills 
A switch drives the supply of nerve cells going to our hands and feet. By identifying Hoxc9, we get an idea of the complexity and diversity of cells in our central nervous system.

Feb 20 2017-----News ArchiveLatest research covered daily, archived weekly

Why are you left or right handed?
One assumption was that differences in gene activity of the right and left hemispheres of the brain are responsible for a person's preference in using either the right or left hand. But, maybe not.

Feb 17 2017-----News ArchiveLatest research covered daily, archived weekly

Can cancer meds treat a group of genetic disorders?
RASopathies are common genetic disorders identified by distinct facial features, developmental delays, cognitive impairments, heart problems. There are no treatments. Now two studies suggest that personalized therapies might someday help.

Feb 16, 2017-----News ArchiveLatest research covered daily, archived weekly

The amazing uterus
A University of Missouri study reveals how the uterus has glands that not only assist an embryo in implanting into its voluptuous folds, but also extend uterine development throughout pregnancy.

Feb 15, 2017-----News ArchiveLatest research covered daily, archived weekly

'Goldilocks' rules may govern genes in our evolution
Our evolutionary history points out how a short list of neuro-developmental disorders may be due to the quantity of gene 'copy number variants' (CNVs) we carry. Particularly brain conditions such as autism spectrum disorders, ADHD, schizophrenia, intellectual disability, developmental delay, and epilepsy — may reflect an individual's quantity of CNV combinations.

Feb 14, 2017
-----News ArchiveLatest research covered daily, archived weekly

Everyday chemicals threaten pregnant women
Scientists explain how burning coal produces methyl mercury and raises blood pressure in pregnant women. They also report that parabens, common chemicals in cosmetics, and the antimicrobial agent triclocarban, found in hand and body soaps, both affect newborns.

Feb 13, 2017-----News ArchiveLatest research covered daily, archived weekly

Contraceptive for male monkeys. Humans next?
A contraceptive gel provides long-term and reliable contraception in male rhesus monkeys. The product, Vasalgel™, tried on rabbits in 2016, has the potential to be a reversible alternative to vasectomy.

Feb 10, 2017-----News ArchiveLatest research covered daily, archived weekly

83 New genes for height found
83 new genetic variants that strongly influence human height have been discovered in a study led by Queen Mary University of London, Montreal Heart Institute, The Broad Institute and the University of Exeter, UK.

Feb 9, 2017-----News ArchiveLatest research covered daily, archived weekly

Autism may begin at earliest brain development
Brains of mice with autism-like symptoms develop neural defects when their first brain circuits take shape.

Feb 8, 2017-----News ArchiveLatest research covered daily, archived weekly

Preemies don't use 'top-down sensory prediction'
Babies born prematurely don't use expectations about the world to shape their brains. Full term babies do. New evidence of how important neural processing is to brain development.

Feb 7, 2017-----News ArchiveLatest research covered daily, archived weekly

Stronger muscles for newborn babies
Glucocorticoids effects on the fetus must be considered when treating expectant mothers or newborn babies with steroids. Ongoing research is determining whether these negative effects can be minimized or eliminated by medical intervention — after birth.

Feb 6, 2016-----News ArchiveLatest research covered daily, archived weekly

Protein in womb plays lifelong role in bone health
Researchers find limiting production of the protein myostatin in pregnant mice with osteogenesis imperfecta — or brittle bone disease — results in offspring with stronger, denser bones. This finding might one day provide a new therapy for treating osteogenesis imperfecta.

Feb 3, 2017-----News ArchiveLatest research covered daily, archived weekly

Breathing molecule discovered
Vital to treating respiratory conditions — which could now be better targeted and treated — is the discovery of a vital molecule that regulates breathing. Discovered at the University of Warwick, UK.

Feb 2, 2017-----News ArchiveLatest research covered daily, archived weekly

Ovo protein same across species
Japanese researchers have found the protein — Ovo — in egg and sperm cells within mice and fruit flies. This suggests Ovo is evolutionarily conserved as a mechanism for reproductive cells in all animal species.

Feb 1, 2017-----News ArchiveLatest research covered daily, archived weekly

Chromosome Traffic Cop
Before an egg becomes fertilized, chromosomes must pair up to pass along genetic information. This happens within each reproductive cell (eggs or sperm), when chromosomes of male and female origin move toward each other to eventually join.

Jan 31, 2017-----News ArchiveLatest research covered daily, archived weekly

The Meiosis Tango
Where would we be without meiosis and recombination? Nowhere. All sexually produced life would not exist, as sperm and eggs are made through meiosis. When meiosis doesn't work it can lead to infertility, miscarriage, birth defects and developmental disorder.

Jan 30, 2017-----News ArchiveLatest research covered daily, archived weekly

Scientists create human/pig chimera
Human/animal chimeras can offer insights into early human development and disease onset and provide a realistic drug-testing platform. They may also someday provide a process for growing human cells, tissues, and organs for regenerative medicine. For now, however, they are helping scientists understand how human stem cells grow and specialize.

Jan 27, 2017-----News ArchiveLatest research covered daily, archived weekly

Statins critical in formation of embryo
A single fertilized egg develops into a complete organism simply through repeated cycles of cell division. But, gaps remain in our understanding of how cells arrange themselves into each stage.

Jan 26, 2017-----News ArchiveLatest research covered daily, archived weekly

Genetic engineering tinkers with genes
A new technique will help biologists alter genes. Whether to turn cells into tiny factories and churn out medicines, or modify crops to grow with limited water, or study the effects of a gene on human health, this technique will work on all life forms from bacteria to animals.

Jan 25, 2017-----News ArchiveLatest research covered daily, archived weekly

In proteins, shape matters
A meta-genomic database is now helping fill in 10 percent of previously unknown protein shapes that control growth and influence mobility. They act as catalysts, or transport and store molecules.

Jan 24, 2017-----News ArchiveLatest research covered daily, archived weekly

Can we rescue injured brains?
The Tmem 108 gene forms proteins that enable memory and our sense of direction. But reduced Tmem 108, through mutation, can produce schizophrenia-like symptoms.

Jan 23, 2017-----News ArchiveLatest research covered daily, archived weekly

Hunger switches on predatory brain instincts
Yale University researchers have isolated in the amygdala of the brain, the circuitry that coordinates hunting. The amygdala is known as the brains' center of emotion and motivation. Now, one of its group of neurons is identified as signaling an animal to pursue prey, a second group to bite with jaw and neck muscles to make the kill.

Jan 20, 2017-----News ArchiveLatest research covered daily, archived weekly

New mouse model joins the fight against Zika
Although the worst of the global Zika virus outbreak may be over, we still don't know why the virus persists in certain tissues after the infection has cleared. Or how the immune system counteracts the virus to protect against re-infection? Or, how to determine the chance of long-term complications?

Jan 19, 2017-----News ArchiveLatest research covered daily, archived weekly

Why older mothers likely face birth complications
Pregnant women over 35 years old are more likely to have complications at birth due to delayed and longer labor stages, suggests new research.

Jan 18, 2017-----News ArchiveLatest research covered daily, archived weekly

Salmonella directs brain tumors to self destruct
Biomedical engineers at Duke University have recruited an unlikely ally in the fight against the deadliest form of brain cancer — a strain of salmonella that usually causes food poisoning. The new approach produces a 20 percent survival rate in the rat model tested, typically few live.

Jan 17, 2017-----News ArchiveLatest research covered daily, archived weekly

Key molecular enzyme locates sites of DNA breaks
Research has revealed the function of a widely shared component of the enzyme Zf-GRF domain, as a critical molecular tool needed to begin DNA repair processes.

Jan 16, 2017-----News ArchiveLatest research covered daily, archived weekly

Epstein-Barr virus related to Hodgkin's lymphoma
Researchers at the National Institutes of Health (NIH), along with international colleagues, identify a genetic immune disorder that increases susceptibility to Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) and an associated cancer — Hodgkin's lymphoma.

Jan 13, 2017-----News ArchiveLatest research covered daily, archived weekly

New hope for Prader-Willi syndrome
Duke Health researchers have identified a drug-like small molecule that, in animal experiments, appears to be an effective treatment for a genetic disorder called Prader-Willi syndrome. Studies in mice and human cell lines indicate other gene-based diseases might also benefit.

Jan 12, 2017-----News ArchiveLatest research covered daily, archived weekly

Early trial results shrink pediatric neural tumors
In a clinical trial of selumetinib, a new oral drug, children with the genetic disorder neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF1) and plexiform neurofibromas, tolerated selumetinib with most experiencing shrinkage of their tumors. NF1 affects 1 in 3,000 people.

Jan 11, 2017-----News ArchiveLatest research covered daily, archived weekly

Single target for pre-malignant bone marrow cancers?
Mechanisms that create healthy red blood cells may also target blood disorders such as myelodysplasia (MDS) syndromes. MDS blood disorders are pre-malignant. In each, bone marrow stops producing adequate numbers of healthy blood cells. Knowing the how and why of blood cell formation has given us a clue to possible ways to interrupt these disorders.

Jan 10, 2017-----News ArchiveLatest research covered daily, archived weekly

Missing protein may explain Sudden Infant Death
A protein originally discovered at The Scripps Research Institute (TSRI) appears to monitor lung volume and regulate our breathing, according to a new study led by scientists at TSRI and Harvard Medical School.

Jan 9, 2017-----News ArchiveLatest research covered daily, archived weekly

Brain area for facial recognition grows in adulthood
Our ability to recognize faces improves from infancy to adulthood. Facial recognition grows a part of our brain to record specific facial features to our visual system.

Jan 6, 2017-----News ArchiveLatest research covered daily, archived weekly

RNA pathway plays key role in our lifespan
Humans and other animals carry rogue DNA sequences called Transposable Elements (TEs). To prevent passing TEs onto our children, piRNA pathways in reproductive organs block TEs from being active in sperm and eggs.

Jan 5, 2017-----News ArchiveLatest research covered daily, archived weekly

The role of mTORC1 in TSC and epilepsy
Tuberous Sclerosis Complex (TSC) is a multi-system disease where benign tumors grow on organs such as the brain, kidneys, heart, eyes, skin, and lungs. It can also appear in the central nervous system and result in epilepsy, autism, or other brain issues. The biggest affect on patients are central nervous system disorders.

Jan 4, 2017
-----News ArchiveLatest research covered daily, archived weekly

Low-carb diet relieves a form of intellectual disability

Experimenting on mice with a genetic change similar to that found in people with the rare inherited disease Kabuki syndrome, Johns Hopkins scientists report a very low-carbohydrate diet can "unwind" histones of DNA and improve mental function.

Jan 3, 2017-----News ArchiveLatest research covered daily, archived weekly

Brain white matter predicts cognitive functions by age 1 and 2
A new kind of  brain imaging study could help identify cognitive problems and psychiatric disorders very early to help develop appropriate interventions.

Jan 2, 2017-----News ArchiveLatest research covered daily, archived weekly

How to Turn White Fat Brown
Penn scientists discover a molecular trigger of fat-cell “browning” program, which could lead to better treatments for obesity and diabetes.

Dec 30, 2016-----News ArchiveLatest research covered daily, archived weekly

nSR100 protein's influence on autism
As many as a third of autism cases could be explained by a scarcity of a single protein in the brain. These findings from research at the University of Toronto are an autism breakthrough. They provide a unique opportunity to develop treatments for a disorder that is rooted in a motley crew of genetic faults.

Dec 29, 2016-----News ArchiveLatest research covered daily, archived weekly

The Molecular basis for hydrocephalus
The Sorting nexin 27 (SNX27) molecule directs the recycling of proteins containing type I PSD95–Dlg–ZO1 (PDZ)-binding motifs out of the brain. It is also implicated in Down's syndrome as lower than normal levels of SNX27 can cause hydrocephalus — a common, yet potentially life-threatening birth defect. Fluid surrounding the brain is not tagged for removal and accumulates, enlarging the head.

Dec 28, 2016-----News ArchiveLatest research covered daily, archived weekly

Controlling gene activity in human development
Research reveals long non-coding RNA is important in regulating cell processes. This discovery may lead to insights which improve muscle regeneration and cancer treatments.

Dec 27, 2016-----News ArchiveLatest research covered daily, archived weekly

The Goldilocks effect in aging
Scientists at Salk Institute have found they can balance telomere elongation in stem cells by trimming them. Just like Goldilocks — not too short, not too long, but just right!

Dec 26, 2016-----News ArchiveLatest research covered daily, archived weekly

Figuring out how one X-chromosome is silenced
Researchers now know how one of two X-chromosomes is silenced (turned off) during the development of female human embryos. Also, as well, in lab-grown human stem cells. Turning off one X-chromosome is essential in embryo development to avoid duplicated messages.

Dec 23, 2016-----News ArchiveLatest research covered daily, archived weekly

Gesturing can boost children's creative thinking
Encouraging children to use gestures as they think can help them come up with more creative ideas.

Dec 22, 2016-----News ArchiveLatest research covered daily, archived weekly

New finding reveals battle behind our genes
The complex process regulating how genes are turned on and off is often compared to following a recipe. Miss a genetic ingredient, or add it in the wrong order — you could have a disaster.

Dec 21, 2016-----News ArchiveLatest research covered daily, archived weekly

We may not have lifelong immunity to toxoplasmosis
Medical students are taught that once infected with Toxoplasma gondii — the "cat parasite" — then you are protected from reinfection for the rest of your life. This dogma should be questioned.

Dec 20, 2016-----News ArchiveLatest research covered daily, archived weekly

Kangaroo mothering helps preemies 20 years later
Study funded by Saving Brains shows Kangaroo Mother Care kids 20 years later are better behaved, have larger brains, higher paychecks, more protective and nurturing families.

Dec 19, 2016-----News ArchiveLatest research covered daily, archived weekly

Secret to smart shopping: The right parenting style
Have you ever wondered how to raise children who will become wise consumers once they are adults? Turns out that parents are the primary agents who will socialize their children — more than friends, other adults or organizations such as churches.

Dec 16, 2016-----News ArchiveLatest research covered daily, archived weekly

Left hand does know what the right hand is doing
The saying goes that "your left hand doesn't know what your right hand is doing," but actually, your left hand is paying more attention than you'd think.

Dec 15, 2016-----News ArchiveLatest research covered daily, archived weekly

What makes a neuron a neuron?
Researchers finds clues within RNA-binding proteins in brain cells that helps explain why almost every RNA-binding protein has a sibling - or "paralog."

Dec 14, 2016-----News ArchiveLatest research covered daily, archived weekly

Designing switches to control cell fate
Researchers at the University of Wisconsin-Madison have developed a strategy to reprogram cells from one type to another more efficiently than other methods.

Dec 13, 2016-----News ArchiveLatest research covered daily, archived weekly

Neural stem cells transport proteins just like RNA
Scientists can now observe molecules as they ascend neural stem cells to form new neurons in the brain. Duke University scientists got their first glimpse of these molecules moving along a stem cell highway which exists at the same length as developing neurons.

Dec 12, 2016
-----News ArchiveLatest research covered daily, archived weekly

Turning off Asthma Attacks
Working in labs with human immune cells, Johns Hopkins researchers have identified a critical "off" switch used in a cell to turn on an immune response contributing to asthma attacks. The switch is made up of regulatory proteins controlling one of many immune signal pathways.

Dec 9, 2016-----News ArchiveLatest research covered daily, archived weekly

China's one-child policy, likely overblown, now gone
It's common for media and academics to cite the statistic that China's one-child policy has led to anywhere from 30 million to 60 million "missing girls", creating a gender gap in the world's most populated nation.

Dec 8, 2016-----News ArchiveLatest research covered daily, archived weekly

Links between epilepsy drugs and birth defects
A joint study by researchers from the Universities of Liverpool and Manchester has found a link between birth defects and certain types of epilepsy medication.

Dec 7, 2016-----News ArchiveLatest research covered daily, archived weekly

Low vitamin D in newborns increases risk MS later
Babies born with low levels of vitamin D may be more likely to develop multiple sclerosis (MS) later in life than babies with higher vitamin D levels.

Dec 6, 2016-----News ArchiveLatest research covered daily, archived weekly

Toddlers can tell when others hold 'false beliefs'
A new study finds 2.5 year-old children can answer questions about people acting on 'false beliefs', an ability most researchers believe will not develop until age 4.

Dec 5, 2016-----News ArchiveLatest research covered daily, archived weekly

Protein that enables our brains and muscles to talk
A huge colony of receptors must be correctly positioned and functioning on muscle cells in order to receive signals from our brains. Now a protein has been identified that helps anchor those receptors, ensuring receptor formation and function.

Dec 2, 2016-----News ArchiveLatest research covered daily, archived weekly

Tracking development of individual blood stem cells
Harvard Stem Cell Institute (HSCI) researchers use a new cell-labeling technique to track development of adult blood cells to original stem cell in bone marrow — advancing our understanding of blood development and blood diseases.

Dec 1, 2016-----News ArchiveLatest research covered daily, archived weekly

Having last baby after 35? Mental sharpness increases
A new study finds women have better brainpower after menopause if they had their last baby after 35, or used hormonal contraceptives for more than 10 years, or began their menstrual cycle before turning 13. The women were tested for their verbal memory, attention, concentration, and visual perception.

Nov 30, 2016-----News ArchiveLatest research covered daily, archived weekly

Mouse embryos put in suspended animation for weeks
Inhibiting a molecular path lets mouse blastocysts survive for weeks in the lab. Researchers have found a way to pause the development of early mouse embryos for up to a month in the lab. The finding has potential implications for assisted reproduction, regenerative medicine, aging, and even cancers.

Nov 29, 2016-----News ArchiveLatest research covered daily, archived weekly

Tissue damage is key for a cell to reprogram
Damaged cells will send signals to neighboring cells to reprogram them back to an embryonic state. This initiates tissue repair and could have implications for treating degenerative diseases.

Nov 28, 2016-----News ArchiveLatest research covered daily, archived weekly

'Princess Leia' brainwaves help store memories
Every night while you sleep, electrical waves of brain activity circle around each side of your brain, tracing a pattern that — were it on the surface of your head — might look like the twin hair buns of Star Wars' Princess Leia.

Nov 25, 2016-----News ArchiveLatest research covered daily, archived weekly

Measuring the gaze between mom and autistic baby
Mothers and children with autism spectrum disorder communicate through their gaze just as all parents do. However, a new tool measuring that gaze and its impact on an infant's neurologic development, reveals more.

Nov 24, 2016-----News ArchiveLatest research covered daily, archived weekly

Lying face up pregnant could increase risk of stillbirth
Researchers at the University of Auckland have found that pregnant women who lie on their backs in the third trimester, may be increasing their risk for stillbirth.

Nov 23, 2016-----News ArchiveLatest research covered daily, archived weekly

Mom Rheumatoid Arthritis links to epilepsy in child
A new study shows a link between mothers with rheumatoid arthritis and children with epilepsy. Rheumatoid arthritis (RA), an autoimmune disease, causes our own immune system to attack our joints. It differs from osteoarthritis, caused by wear and tear on the joints.

Nov 22, 2016-----News ArchiveLatest research covered daily, archived weekly

A protein that points cells in the right direction
In animals, the stretching of skin tissue during the growth of an embryo requires the unique CDC-42 GTPase protein. It directs the movement of migrating cells.

Nov 22, 2016-----News Archive Latest research covered daily, archived weekly

First 3-D mathematical model of labor contractions
Although researchers have looked for the origins of preterm birth for years, the causes are still unknown. By studying the electrical activity causing contractions, a model exists that may aid in predicting preterm birth.

Nov 18, 2016-----News Archive Latest research covered daily, archived weekly

Genes for speech may not be limited to humans
Vocal communication in mice is affected by the same gene needed for human speech..th.

Nov 17, 2016
----- News Archive Latest research covered daily, archived weekly

Insulin resistance reversed by removal of Gal3 protein
By removing the protein galectin-3 (Gal3), a team of investigators were able to reverse diabetic insulin resistance and glucose intolerance in mice used as models of obesity and diabetes.

Nov 16, 2016-----News ArchiveLatest research covered daily, archived weekly

B12 deficiency can increase risk for type 2 diabetes
B12 deficiency during pregnancy may predispose baby into adulthood for metabolic problems such as type-2 diabetes.

Nov 15, 2016-----News ArchiveLatest research covered daily, archived weekly

Non-invasive prenatal test at five weeks of pregnancy?
The latest developments in prenatal technology may make it possible to test for genetic disorders one month into pregnancy.

Nov 14, 2016
-----News ArchiveLatest research covered daily, archived weekly

Heart disease, leukemia links to dysfunctional nucleus
In cells, the nucleus keeps DNA protected and intact within an enveloping membrane. But a new study reveals that this containment influences how genes are expressed.

Nov 11, 2016-----News ArchiveLatest research covered daily, archived weekly

Blood vessels control brain growth
Blood vessels play a vital role in stem cell reproduction, enabling the brain to grow and develop in the womb, reveals new research in mice.

Nov 10, 2016-----News ArchiveLatest research covered daily, archived weekly

Antibody protects developing fetus from Zika virus
The most devastating consequence of Zika virus is the development of microcephaly, an abnormally small head, in babies infected in utero. Now, research has identified a human antibody preventing pregnant mice, from infecting the fetus with Zika and damaging the placenta. It also protects adult mice from the Zika disease.

Nov 9, 2016-----News ArchiveLatest research covered daily, archived weekly

Better treatments possible for child brain cancer
More than 4,000 children and teens are diagnosed with brain cancer yearly, killing more children than any other cancer. Researchers targeted an aggressive pediatric brain tumor — CNS-PNET — using a zebrafish model. And, in about 80% of cases, eliminated the tumor using existing drugs.

Nov 8, 2016-----News ArchiveLatest research covered daily, archived weekly

Autism linked to mutations in mitochondrial DNA
Study of 903 affected children shows inherited, spontaneous mutations increase the risk of autism spectrum disorder (ASD). The children diagnosed with autism had greater numbers of harmful mutations in their mitochondrial DNA than other family members.

Nov 7, 2016-----News ArchiveLatest research covered daily, archived weekly

Mother's blood test may predict birth complications
DLK1 protein found in the blood of pregnant women could be developed to test the health of babies and aid in decisions on early elective deliveries, according to a study led by Queen Mary University of London.

Nov 4, 2016-----News ArchiveLatest research covered daily, archived weekly

Essential mouse genes give insight into human disease
About a third of all genes in mammals are essential to life. Now an international, multi-institutional team, describes their discovery of which genes they are — and what impact they make on human development and disease.

Nov 3, 2016-----News ArchiveLatest research covered daily, archived weekly

Newborns given dextrose gel avoid hypoglycaemia
A single dose of dextrose gel, rubbed inside a newborn baby's mouth an hour after birth, can lower the risk for developing neonatal hypoglycaemia, according to a randomized study.

Nov 2, 2016-----News ArchiveLatest research covered daily, archived weekly

Mitochondria divide differently than once thought
For the first time a study reveals how mitochondria, the power generators found in nearly all living cells, regularly divide and multiply.

Nov 1, 2016-----News ArchiveLatest research covered daily, archived weekly

Customizing vitamin D may benefit pregnant women
Individualized vitamin D supplements help protect pregnant women from its deficiency. Tailored doses may compensate for individual risk factors and even protect bones.

Oct 31, 2016-----News ArchiveLatest research covered daily, archived weekly

Antibody breaks leukemia's hold
In mouse models and patient cells, anti-CD98 antibody disrupts interactions between leukemia cells and surrounding blood vessels, inhibiting cancer's spread.

Oct 28, 2016-----News ArchiveLatest research covered daily, archived weekly

Strong, steady forces needed for cell division
Biologists studying cell division have long disagreed about how much force is needed to pull chromosomes apart — in order to form two new cells. A question fundamental to how cells divide.

Oct 27, 2016-----News ArchiveLatest research covered daily, archived weekly

"Fixing" energy signals to treat mitochondrial disease
Restoring cellular energy signals may offset mitochondrial diseases in humans. Using existing drugs to treat lab animals, researchers have set the stage for clinical trials.

Oct 26, 2016-----News ArchiveLatest research covered daily, archived weekly

How eggs get the wrong number of chromosomes
Twentyfour hours before ovulation, human oocytes start to divide into what will become mature eggs. Ideally, eggs include a complete set of 23 chromosomes, but the process is prone to error — especially as women age.

Oct 25, 2016-----News ArchiveLatest research covered daily, archived weekly

Fatal preemie disease due to mitochondrial failure
A life-threatening condition preventing gut development in premature infants may be triggered by a disruption in the way the body metabolizes energy from Mitochondria.

Oct 24, 2016-----News ArchiveLatest research covered daily, archived weekly

Zika virus spread timed to brain growth spurts
Scientists from the Florida campus of The Scripps Research Institute (TSRI) are able to pinpoint timing of the most aggressive ZIKA attacks on newborn mouse brains — information that could help treatments.

Oct 21, 2016-----News ArchiveLatest research covered daily, archived weekly

Short jump from single-cell to multi-cell animals
Our single-celled ancestors lived about 800 million years ago. Now, new evidence suggests their leap to multi-celled organisms was not quite as mysterious as once believed.

Oct 20, 2016-----News ArchiveLatest research covered daily, archived weekly

Brainstem and visual cortex control our eyes
A mouse study is illuminating how our brain quickly adapts and functions. Tracking mouse eye movements, researchers make an unexpected discovery — the part of the brain known to process sensory information, our visual cortex, is also key to spontaneous eye movements.

Oct 19, 2016-----News ArchiveLatest research covered daily, archived weekly

Embryos make sex cells in their first two weeks
Producing the next generation of life is already occuring in an embryo in its own first weeks. Human primordial germ cells — which give rise to sperm or egg cells — are present in embryos by their second week of development.

Oct 18, 2016
-----News ArchiveLatest research covered daily, archived weekly

Mom's BMI may affect biological age of her baby
Higher Body Mass Index (BMI) in a mother before pregnancy is associated with shorter telomere length — a biomarker for biological age — in her newborn. Her baby's short telomere length means the baby's cells have shorter lifespans.

Oct 17, 2016
-----News ArchiveLatest research covered daily, archived weekly

Two distinct cell types can initiate Crohn's disease
A new discovery could lead to personalized treatment for the debilitating gastrointestinal disorder called Crohn's. There appear to be two distinct disease types. One expressed in normal colon tissue, the other in the small intestine. Detecting which type a patient has will assist her in her treatment and desire to get pregnant or carry a pregnancy.

Oct 14, 2016-----News ArchiveLatest research covered daily, archived weekly

Potential treatment of newborns via amniotic fluid?
A breakthrough study offers promise for therapeutic management of congenital diseases — in utero — using designer gene sequences.

Oct 13, 2016-----News ArchiveLatest research covered daily, archived weekly

Infants use their prefrontal cortex to learn
Researchers have always thought the prefrontal cortex (PFC) — the brain region involved in some of the highest forms of cognition and reasoning — was too underdeveloped in young children, especially infants, to participate in complex cognitive tasks. A new study suggests otherwise.

Oct 12, 2016-----News ArchiveLatest research covered daily, archived weekly

'Amplifier' helps make connections in the fetal brain
A special amplifier makes neural signals stronger in babies — then stops once neural connections are fully strengthened.

Oct 11, 2016
-----News ArchiveLatest research covered daily, archived weekly

Neurons migrate throughout infancy
A previously unrecognized stage of brain development has just been recognized to continue long after birth. Neurons in the cerebral cortex, the outer layer of the brain, migrate into the cortex continuing growth throughout infancy.

Oct 10, 2016
-----News ArchiveLatest research covered daily, archived weekly

Calcium triggers stem cells to generate bone
Calcium is the main constituent of bone, and now is found to play a major role in regulating its growth. This new finding may affect treatment of conditions caused by too much collagen, such as fibrosis which thickens and scars connective tissue, as well in diseases of too little bone growth, such as Treacher Collins Syndrome (TCS).

Oct 7, 2016-----News ArchiveLatest research covered daily, archived weekly

How evolution has given us 5 fingers
Have you ever wondered why our hands have exactly five fingers? Dr. Marie Kmita's team has. The researchers at the Institut de recherches cliniques de Montréal and Université de Montréal have uncovered a part of this mystery.

Oct 6, 2016-----News ArchiveLatest research covered daily, archived weekly

New links between genes and bigger brains

A number of new links between genes and brain size have been identified by United Kingdom scientists, hopefully opening up whole new avenues of understanding brain development including diseases like dementia.

Oct 5, 2016
-----News ArchiveLatest research covered daily, archived weekly

Progesterone in contraceptives promotes flu healing

Over 100 million women are on hormonal contraceptives. All contain some form of progesterone, either alone or in combination with estrogen. Researchers found treatment with progesterone protects female mice against influenza by reducing inflammation and improving pulmonary function.

Oct 4, 2016
-----News ArchiveLatest research covered daily, archived weekly

ZIKA in Men? "No procreation for 6 months"
The Zika virus has largely spread via mosquitoes, but it can also be spread by sexual intercourse. Men who may have been exposed should wait at least six months before trying to conceive a child with a partner. Regardless whether they ever had any symptoms, say US federal health officials.

Oct 3, 2016-----News ArchiveLatest research covered daily, archived weekly

Genetically modified baby boy - with 3 parents

New, cheap and accurate DNA-editing techniques called CRISPR-Cas9 and SNT, or single nucleic targeting, are allowing for gene modification in humans. It is not science fiction anymore. In a first, a baby boy with modified DNA has been born in Mexico to overcome a mitochondrial disease that claimed the life of his two earlier sibblings

Sep 30, 2016-----News ArchiveLatest research covered daily, archived weekly

Meet the world's largest bony fish

For the first time, the genome of the ocean sunfish (Mola mola), the world's largest bony fish, has been sequenced. Researchers involved in the Genome 10K (G10K) project want to collect 10,000 nonmammalian vertebrate genomes for comparative analyses. The ocean sunfish genome has now revealed several altered genes that may explain its' fast growth, large size and unusual shape.

Sep 29, 2016-----News ArchiveLatest research covered daily, archived weekly

Genetic variations that cause skull-fusion disorders

During the first year of life, the human brain doubles in size, continuing to grow through adolescence. But sometimes, the loosely connected plates of a baby's skull fuse too early, a disorder known as craniosynostosis. It can also produce facial and skull deformities, potentially damaging a young brain.

Sep 28, 2016-----News ArchiveLatest research covered daily, archived weekly

Heart defect genes both inside and outside the heart
Congenital heart defects (CHDs) are a leading cause of birth defect-related deaths. How genetic alterations cause such defects is complicated by the fact that CHD's many critical genes are unknown. Those that are known often contribute only small increases in CHD risk.

Sep 27, 2016-----News ArchiveLatest research covered daily, archived weekly

Cesarean baby 15% more likely to become obese

Cesarean born babies are 15% more likely to become obese as children than individuals born by vaginal birth and 64% more likely to be obese than their siblings born by vaginal birth. The increased risk may persist through adulthood. All of this data is according to a large study from Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health.

Sep 26, 2016-----News ArchiveLatest research covered daily, archived weekly

Male primes female for reproduction - but at a cost
Research has discovered that male worms, through an invisible chemical "essence," prime female worms for reproduction but with the unfortunate side effect of also hastening her aging. The results might lead to human therapies to delay puberty or prolong fertility.

Sep 23, 2016-----News ArchiveLatest research covered daily, archived weekly

Why Tardigrades Are So Indestructible

Tardigrades, or “water bears,” are microscopic animals capable of withstanding some of the most severe environmental conditions — even being "dead" for 30 years, and then restored to life! Research from Japan has now created the most accurate picture yet of the tardigrade genome — and why it matters to humans.

Sep 22, 2016-----News ArchiveLatest research covered daily, archived weekly

Mouse bone marrow cells reduce miscarriage?

Progenitor cells are like stem cells, but differentiated by a first step into one specific cell type. Research now finds the progenitor cells in bone marrow — which replace worn out cells — may help placental blood vessel growth and reduce abnormal placental development such as in pre-eclampsia.

Sep 21, 2016-----News ArchiveLatest research covered daily, archived weekly

How maternal genes give control to embryonic genes
After fertilization, embryo development must shift from maternal proteins to early embryo or zygote proteins. This is called the maternal-to-zygotic transition (MZT), a step still not fully understood. Existing technology isn't sensitive enough to pick up everything happening in a zygote. But, a new technique now exists to map epigenetic DNA changes.

Sep 20, 2016-----News ArchiveLatest research covered daily, archived weekly

Stem cells may halt Multiple Sclerosis symptoms

Use of chemotherapy followed by autologous haematopoietic stem cell transplantation (aHSCT) has fully stopped clinical relapses and development of new brain lesions in 23 of 24 patients with multiple sclerosis (MS) — for a prolonged period without needing ongoing medication. But there is risk.

Sep 19, 2016-----News ArchiveLatest research covered daily, archived weekly

Gene linked to infertility in male mice

Research from the Department of Neuroscience at the University of Cambridge, Cambridge, United Kingdom shows how the disruption of a gene in development, is linked to abnomal sperm and infertility in male mice.

Sep 16, 2016-----News ArchiveLatest research covered daily, archived weekly

High food availability slows down cell aging
Hibernation was long considered the secret behind the long lifespan — almost 12 years — of the edible dormouse. However, researchers have now found that high food availability during active summer seasons contributes to their long lives. Increased food between hibernations allows them to slow down their cell aging.

Sep 15, 2016-----News ArchiveLatest research covered daily, archived weekly

Zika brain injury therapy must start at time of bite
For the first time, abnormal brain development has been documented experimentally following a Zika infection in offspring of a non-human primate.

Sep 14, 2016-----News ArchiveLatest research covered daily, archived weekly

How GBS bacteria can cause preterm birth
Approximately 20-30% of healthy, adult women carry group B streptococcus (GBS) bacteria — vaginally or rectally. Though GBS can be harmless, it also causes premature birth and pregnancy complications in mice.

Sep 13, 2016-----News ArchiveLatest research covered daily, archived weekly

Placenta pivotal in influencing pregnancy outcome

New research provides the first clear evidence that the amount of nutrients transported to the fetus by the placenta is adjusted according to both the fetal need to grow, and the mother's physical ability to provide food.

Sep 12, 2016-----News ArchiveLatest research covered daily, archived weekly

How does a cell initiate DNA repair?

Understanding how molecules and genes repair aging DNA has implications for both a longer life and stabilizing our current quality of life. More research needs to be done, but recent work may help scientists' assist repair of DNA.

Sep 9, 2016-----News ArchiveLatest research covered daily, archived weekly

lncRNA structure affects its function

Several years ago, biologists discovered a new type of genetic material known as long noncoding RNA or lcnRNA. This RNA does not code for proteins and is copied from sections of the genome. In the 1970's it was considered "junk DNA."

Sep 8, 2016-----News ArchiveLatest research covered daily, archived weekly

Cell fate a result of genetic tugs of war

Developing blood cells are caught in a tug of war between competing gene networks to decide what cell type each will become.

Sep 7, 2016-----News ArchiveLatest research covered daily, archived weekly

Unlocking first steps in organ and tissue development

New research uncovers the first steps of how human organs and tissues develop — unlocking new potential for diagnosing and understanding developmental disorders.

Sep 6, 2016-----News ArchiveLatest research covered daily, archived weekly

Stem cells differ in mice, monkeys, and humans

Human stem cells are out of the shadows, but quietly. But not too shabby for humans. New research shows that certain primate stem cells have pluripotency superior to some types from from mice. The study, published in Nature, maps how pluripotency differs among mice, monkeys, and humans, and illustrates for the first time a developmental counterpart of primate stem cells.

Sep 5, 2016-----News ArchiveLatest research covered daily, archived weekly

Chemicals from fracking may harm fertility

More than 15 million Americans live within one-mile of Unconventional Oil and Gas (UOG) operations. UOGs combine directional drilling and hydraulic fracturing, or "fracking," to release natural gas from underground rock. Now, exposure to fracking and drilling chemicals, even at the lowest doses, are found to alter the ovaries of mice.

Sep 2, 2016-----News ArchiveLatest research covered daily, archived weekly

Checkmating the "Red King Theory"

In Lewis Carroll's book "Through the Looking-Glass," the Red Queen tells Alice how a race is run in Wonderland, stating: "Here, you see, it takes all the running you can do, to keep in the same place." This statement holds true in nature. Competitive species are under constant pressure to evolve rapidly to outgun their competition — the Red Queen Theory.

Sep 1, 2016-----News ArchiveLatest research covered daily, archived weekly

Morrbid gene fights infection havoc

A new study has identified that inflammatory disorders are mediated by RNA molecules called long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs). Turns out that the Morrbid gene regulates immune cells via lncRNAs, which are key in fighting infection and preventing inflammatory disorders.

Aug 31, 2016-----News ArchiveLatest research covered daily, archived weekly

A protein that promotes the breakdown of fat

Researchers have found a protein on the surface of fat droplets — especially in the muscles of endurance athletes — that can kick-start a more efficient breakdown of fat throughout our bodies.

Aug 30, 2016-----News ArchiveLatest research covered daily, archived weekly

Immune cells active in brain development
Microglia are cells that fight brain diseases and injury by swallowing foreign "objects" and activating repair molecules. Recent research suggests these cells are active even under normal conditions, and contribute to sculpting neural circuits.

Aug 29, 2016-----News ArchiveLatest research covered daily, archived weekly

Face shape is in our genes

Researchers have made great strides in identifying genes that contribute to facial traits. The many characteristics that make up a person's face, nose size and face width, are determined by specific genes and their variations.

Aug 26, 2016-----News ArchiveLatest research covered daily, archived weekly

Two proteins preserve vital genetic information

Understanding every aspect of cell division helps explain the origins of key genetic disorders, including cancers. Cancer is often driven by genetic mutations acquired over time to a person's DNA. Alterations can occur if proteins do not properly organize and separate as cells divide and multiply.

Aug 25, 2016-----News ArchiveLatest research covered daily, archived weekly

A molecular alarm clock wakes resting eggs
At the start of reproductive life an ovary contains, on average, several thousand immature eggs (ovules) in a resting state — that can last for decades. But how does each resting egg know at what time to prepare for ovulation?

Aug 24, 2016-----News ArchiveLatest research covered daily, archived weekly

Risk factors for preterm birth can be changed
A significant portion of preterm births might be avoided by reducing or eliminating any one of three major risk factors.

Aug 23, 2016-----News ArchiveLatest research covered daily, archived weekly

Zika infection may affect adult brain cells
New findings suggest brain risk may not be limited to fetuses of pregnant women. Some adult brain cells may be vulnerable to infection as well.

Aug 22, 2016-----News ArchiveLatest research covered daily, archived weekly

How fish fins became fingers

One of the great transformations for descendants of fish was to become creatures that walk on land, with thick, sturdy "toes" replacing their long, elegant fins. Scientists from the University of Chicago now know how the same cells which make fin rays in fish, form fingers and toes in animals.

Aug 19, 2016-----News ArchiveLatest research covered daily, archived weekly

Plastic BPS chemical harms human egg cells

In a new study, UCLA researchers have found that Bisphenol S (BPS) is just as harmful to the reproductive system as bisphenol A (BPA), the chemical it is supposed to replace. In fact, BPS damages a woman's eggs at lower doses than BPA.

Aug 18, 2016-----News ArchiveLatest research covered daily, archived weekly

Customizing breast milk for premature children

About 7 percent of all Danish children are born prematurely. This is significant to the child and affects a mother's body which unexpectedly must produce nutrition for her newborn.

Aug 17, 2016
-----News ArchiveLatest research covered daily, archived weekly

Mom in Single Family NICU room is best for preemies
Research has established the single greatest contributor to long-term neuro and behavioral development in preterm infants is mothers' care. This is found in single-family room Neonatal Intensive Care Units (NICUs) that allow the most immediate opportunity for a mother's involvement.

Aug 16, 2016-----News ArchiveLatest research covered daily, archived weekly

Jaw-dropping research explains how mouth forms

Whitehead Institute researchers have identified the pre-mouth area in faces of developing embryonic frogs. This area "unzips" to form the mouth. The research highlights the precision needed to create a mouth and identifies the processes driving mouth formation.

Aug 15, 2016-----News ArchiveLatest research covered daily, archived weekly

A vaccine for strep throat and rheumatic fever?
Researchers from Griffith University's Institute for Glycomics have announced that they will begin Phase 1 clinical trials on a new, needle-free vaccine targeted at Streptococcus A infection, the cause of strep throat and rheumatic heart disease.

Aug 12, 2016-----News ArchiveLatest research covered daily, archived weekly

Is there a 'mother's curse' ?

There is new evidence that "the mother's curse", or a moms' ability to transmit genes that harm her sons — but not her daughters, holds true in all animals.

Aug 11, 2016-----News ArchiveLatest research covered daily, archived weekly

Non-Zika microcephaly helps explain brain growth

Protein that helps new born brain cells divide, also plays a key role in brain expansion. Long before Zika virus became a household word, microcephaly as a birth defect puzzled scientists and doctors.

Aug 10, 2016-----News ArchiveLatest research covered daily, archived weekly

Tall or short, thick or thin what affects limb size?

For over 60 years, scientists have theorized that a person's body shape and size can be influenced by the climate where they live. Now a new study from the University of Tennessee, Knoxville, suggests there may be more to the equation.

Aug 9, 2016-----News ArchiveLatest research covered daily, archived weekly

Signals that trigger labor and delivery

Researchers believe they now know more about what signals the start of labor and delivery, perhaps better understanding triggers of preterm delivery.

Aug 8, 2016-----News ArchiveLatest research covered daily, archived weekly

Breakthrough in how stem cells become specialized

Scientists have made a major advance in understanding how cells, each containing all the same genetic information, become diverse. It seems the OCT4 protein primes specific genes to begin differentiation.

Aug 5, 2016-----News ArchiveLatest research covered daily, archived weekly

The force is strong — with embryo cells

The strength of inner contractions determines whether a cell becomes part of the embryo or part of the placenta. At the cell level, this is determined by the staggered amount of proteins produced which drives a cell to contract or stop contracting.

Aug 4, 2016-----News ArchiveLatest research covered daily, archived weekly

Common diabetes drug may help prevent preterm birth

Metformin, a medication routinely used by millions with type 2 diabetes, plays an unexpected role in blocking a significant cause of preterm birth, according to new research.

Aug 3, 2016-----News ArchiveLatest research covered daily, archived weekly

Origin of the female orgasm

Female orgasm has been described as a happy afterthought of evolution — unnecessary, but fun! Now, a new study in mammals shows that the female orgasm actually helps stimulate ovulation.

Aug 2, 2016-----News ArchiveLatest research covered daily, archived weekly

Breastfeeding builds better brains

Pre-term babies fed more breast milk in the first 28 days of life have a larger volume of gray matter, a better IQ, academic achievement in memory and motor function by age 7.

Aug 1, 2016-----News ArchiveLatest research covered daily, archived weekly

Embryonic gene, Nanog, can reverse cell aging

The fountain of youth may reside in a gene in embryonic stem cells called Nanog. It's discovery may lead to treatments for age-related disorders such as atherosclerosis, osteoporosis, Alzheimer's and Progeria syndrome in children.

Jul 29, 2016-----News ArchiveLatest research covered daily, archived weekly

Makeup therapy in a down economy

During tough economic times, women engage in the "lipstick effect," stocking up on cosmetics and beauty products — a simple and familiar way to address their personal economic situation.

Jul 28, 2016-----News ArchiveLatest research covered daily, archived weekly

Cinnamon may be a fragrant medicine for the brain
If new research is confirmed, the standard advice for failing students might one day be: Study harder and eat your cinnamon!

Jul 27, 2016-----News ArchiveLatest research covered daily, archived weekly

A molecule for making friends

The Urocortin-3 molecular helps mice and humans find new friends according to research from the Max Planck Institute of Psychiatry.

Jul 26, 2016-----News ArchiveLatest research covered daily, archived weekly

Pyramid cells cluster, vibrate and signal our brain
Our cerebral cortex acts like a vast switchboard, with countless lines carrying information about our changing environment — gathered from our sensory organs. The flow of this data is directed by individual pyramid cells clustered like bells on a dendrite chord, signalling our brain for attention.

Jul 25, 2016-----News ArchiveLatest research covered daily, archived weekly

How environmental stresses cause birth defects
For the first time, scientists believe they've discovered a direct cause for multiple birth defects from environmental stress.

Jul 22, 2016-----News ArchiveLatest research covered daily, archived weekly

Virus found in women with unexplained infertility

A new study has found that a little-known human herpesvirus — HHV-6A — infects the uterine lining in 43% of women with unexplained infertility. It was not found in fertile women.

Jul 21, 2016-----News ArchiveLatest research covered daily, archived weekly

Pregnant nicotine exposure higher than reported

More women may be smoking and/or exposed to nicotine during pregnancy than previously thought, says a new study from Cincinnati Children's Hospital in collaboration with Cradle Cincinnati.

Jul 20, 2016-----News ArchiveLatest research covered daily, archived weekly

Cells send out stop/go signals to extend nerves

Molecules can send signals across great distances to make neurons extend as well as retract their growth.

Jul 19, 2016-----News ArchiveLatest research covered daily, archived weekly

Anatomy of a decision
In the first genome-scale experiment of its kind, researchers have seen how a mouse embryo first transforms from a ball of unfocussed cells (gastrula) into a structured embryo.

Jul 18, 2016-----News ArchiveLatest research covered daily, archived weekly

Sound waves to separate twin placentas?

High-energy sound waves could treat a potentially deadly complication of some twin pregnancies — TTTS or Twin-Twin Transfusion Syndrome, affecting one in seven identical twin pregnancies.

Jul 15, 2016-----News ArchiveLatest research covered daily, archived weekly

Selfish mitochondria implicated in diseases
Mitochondria produce most of the chemical energy that powers a cell. Likewise, their dysfunction is associated with a wide variety of illnesses: autism, Alzheimer's, dementia, schizophrenia, Parkinson's, epilepsy, stroke, cancer, chronic fatigue syndrome as well as cardiovascular disease.

Jul 14, 2016-----News ArchiveLatest research covered daily, archived weekly

Powering up: growing neurons make an energy jump

Our brains can survive only for a few minutes without oxygen. Research has now identified that a dramatic metabolic shift occurs in developing neurons, from glucose to oxygen as their primary source of energy.

Jul 13, 2016-----News ArchiveLatest research covered daily, archived weekly

Virus in pregnancy linked to austim disorders

Findings in mice may help explain how viral infection during pregnancy raises the risk for autism and schizophrenia in mouse pups — and humans.

Jul 12, 2016-----News ArchiveLatest research covered daily, archived weekly

Bipolar disorder link to striatum brain region

Bipolar disorder is one of the most-studied neurological disorders. The Greeks noticed symptoms of the disease in the first century. But, science has been overlooking a possible brain region for its source - the striatum.

Jul 11, 2016-----News ArchiveLatest research covered daily, archived weekly

Epigenetics could explain puzzle of diabetes inheritance

A mother's diet in pregnancy can permanently affect her child — and could be strongly influenced by genetic variation in an unexpected part of the genome — her ribosomal DNA.

Jul 8, 2016-----News ArchiveLatest research covered daily, archived weekly

Many common chemicals endanger brain development

Scientists, health practitioners and child advocates are calling attention to growing evidence that common and widely used chemicals endanger neurodevelopment in the fetus as well as in children of all ages.

Jul 7, 2016-----News ArchiveLatest research covered daily, archived weekly

Children's immune cells may explain all their illnesses

New research shows immune systems of young mice secrete low levels of the cytokine — CD4 T — needed for survival during infection. By comparison, older mice secret more.

Jul 6, 2016-----News ArchiveLatest research covered daily, archived weekly

"Feeling good" stimulates immune system

Feeling good may help our bodies fight germs better, according to results from experiments with mice. When activated, nerve cells that signal emotional reward also boost mouse immune systems.

Jul 5, 2016-----News ArchiveLatest research covered daily, archived weekly

How the Pentagone protein controls development
How do the cells in a human embryo know their current location — or where to go next? Why do some cells form a finger, but not others? University of Freiburg biologists in Germany believe the protein Pentagone controls these steps in the fruit fly — and perhaps in humans as well.

Jul 4, 2016-----News ArchiveLatest research covered daily, archived weekly

Why does mitochondria DNA only come from mom?

Like most cells, sperm contain energy-producing mitochondria. However, once a sperm fertilizes an egg, its own mitochondria break down. Scientists have a new clue to why the most mitochondrial DNA is passed down to children from their mothers — and not their fathers.

Jul 1, 2016-----News ArchiveLatest research covered daily, archived weekly

Finding human development's first gear
A research team has identified that 4 genes operate for only a few hours in the earliest stages of life, to perform as "first gear'" in the shift into a human embryo.

Jun 30, 2016-----News ArchiveLatest research covered daily, archived weekly

Study shows Zika infection longer in pregnancy

Research with monkeys has shown that a first infection with the Zika virus protects against future infections. But with pregnancy, Zika stays in the body a drastically long time.

Jun 29, 2016-----News ArchiveLatest research covered daily, archived weekly

Daughters of obese mouse dads risk breast cancer

Obese male mice and normal weight female mice produce female pups that are overweight at birth through childhood, have delayed development of their breast tissue, and have increased rates of breast cancer.

Jun 28, 2016-----News ArchiveLatest research covered daily, archived weekly

CDC clinical trial for experimental Zika vaccine

The US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention has approved clinical trial status for another experimental Zika vaccine. The drug will be tested on a small sample of human participants, a mere five months after the World Health Organization declared Zika a public health emergency.

Jun 27, 2016-----News ArchiveLatest research covered daily, archived weekly

Saint Louis University to launch Zika vaccine trial

Saint Louis University's (SLU) vaccine center has been tapped by the National Institutes of Health to conduct a human clinical trial of a vaccine to prevent the Zika virus, which can cause devastating birth defects in babies.

Jun 24, 2016-----News ArchiveLatest research covered daily, archived weekly

Loss of essential protein linked to hydrocephalus
Researchers at St. Jude Children's Research Hospital have developed mice lacking the Alix protein, in order to study hydrocephalus or "water on the brain." Alix orients epithelial cells in the brain's choroid plexus in order to prevent compromises to the brain's barrier layer.

Jun 23, 2016
-----News ArchiveLatest research covered daily, archived weekly

Low thyroid in pregnancy risks schizophrenia in baby
Study links a mother's untreated low thyroid hormone levels during pregnancy with a 2% increased risk for her child having neurodevelopmental disorders — such as autism, bipolar disorder or schizophrenia.

Jun 22, 2016-----News ArchiveLatest research covered daily, archived weekly

Teen poor attention control risk for anxiety disorders
Research has found that poor attention control in the early teen years is related to a genetic risk factor that can latter appear in the adult as an anxiety disorder — presenting as (1) educational underachievement, (2) depression, (3) drug dependence, or perhaps even (4) suicidal behavior.

Jun 21, 2016-----News ArchiveLatest research covered daily, archived weekly

Pregnant diet can affect multiple generations
New research suggests that even before becomming pregnant, women who eat high-fat, high-sugar diets can predispose multiple generations to metabolic problems, even though their children consume healthy diets.

Jun 20, 2016-----News ArchiveLatest research covered daily, archived weekly

New insights uncovered in Prader-Willi syndrome
Prader-Willi syndrome (PWS) is a rare genetic disease characterized by hyperphagia — a chronic feeling of hunger — coupled with a metabolism that uses drastically fewer calories than normal, leading to excessive eating/obesity in patients with the disease.

Jun 17, 2016
-----News ArchiveLatest research covered daily, archived weekly

Breastmilk best for premature baby's heart
For the first time, breastfeeding is linked to better cardiac structure and function in adults born prematurely.

Jun 16, 2016-----News ArchiveLatest research covered daily, archived weekly

Gene mutation found explaining multiple sclerosis

Although multiple sclerosis (MS) is seen to run in certain families, attempts to find genes linked to the disease have been elusive. For the first time, researchers are now reporting a gene mutation connected directly to the disease.

Jun 15, 2016-----News ArchiveLatest research covered daily, archived weekly

Individuals respond differently to Zika?
One of Zika's mysteries is how the virus passes from an infected mother, through the placenta, to a developing fetus. The route may not be direct either — transmission via multiple cell types may be necessary as it is transmitted through several routes, including mosquito bites, sexual contact, and blood transfusion.

Jun 14, 2016-----News ArchiveLatest research covered daily, archived weekly

Moving can be hazardous to your child's health

Adverse effects were found in adults who had to change homes in childhood, according to a long-term study of 1.4 million Danish children.

Jun 13, 2016-----News ArchiveLatest research covered daily, archived weekly

How melanin gives color to skin, hair and eyes
A year and a half ago, Brown University researchers found a molecular gas pedal that increases melanin production. Now, they have found its brake. Understanding how color enters our eyes, skin and hair, helps explain albinism, or when color doesn't get produced at all.

Jun 10, 2016-----News ArchiveLatest research covered daily, archived weekly

Babies really are cute!
What is it about the sight of an infant that makes almost everyone smile? Big eyes, dewy skin, chubby cheeks, that little nose? An infectious laugh and a captivating smell? While we agree that babies look cute, Oxford University research has found cuteness is designed to appeal to every sense.

Jun 9, 2016-----News ArchiveLatest research covered daily, archived weekly

Your biological clock has a time stamp
Yale School of Medicine researchers have identified the molecular paths involved in aging of human eggs. Such research may eventually lead to correcting age-related damage and improve fertility in women 40 years and older.

Jun 8, 2016-----News ArchiveLatest research covered daily, archived weekly

Maternal effects of smoking continue long after birth

According to a new Yale-led study, early exposure to nicotine can trigger widespread genetic changes that affect brain cell synapses long after birth. The findings help explain why maternal smoking links to behavior changes such as attention deficit-hyperactivity disorder and addiction.

Jun 7, 2016-----News ArchiveLatest research covered daily, archived weekly

A brain clock keeps our memories ticking

Just as members of an orchestra need a conductor to stay on tempo, neurons in the brain need well-timed waves of synapses to organize memories.

Jun 6, 2016-----News ArchiveLatest research covered daily, archived weekly

Gene sequencing diagnoses rare newborn diseases

Canada is examining the need for next-generation gene sequencing of newborns in neonatal intensive care units (NICUs). Their hope is to improve the diagnosis of rare diseases and deliver results quickly to anxious families.

Jun 3, 2016-----News ArchiveLatest research covered daily, archived weekly

The developmental origins of culture

New research investigates how our increasingly global community transmits skills and behaviors across generations. How do children divine strategies to understand and adopt social practices, beliefs, and values from their societies?

Jun 2, 2016-----News ArchiveLatest research covered daily, archived weekly

How the brain makes — and breaks — a habit

Neuroscience is identifying brain chemicals and neural paths that help us switch from habitual behavior into deliberate decision making.

Jun 1, 2016-----News ArchiveLatest research covered daily, archived weekly

Money really does matter in relationships

Money has a significant impact on romantic relationships, finds a new study from China. Our romantic choices are not just based on feelings and emotions, but how rich we feel compared to others.

May 31, 2016-----News ArchiveLatest research covered daily, archived weekly

Executive power — developes from the nursery

A baby's cry not only commands our attention, it rattles our executive function — the exact cognitive thinking we use to make everyday decisions, according to a new University of Toronto study.

May 30, 2016-----News ArchiveLatest research covered daily, archived weekly

Can lifespan be extended by point of view?

Tricking C. elegans into a state of calorie restriction can extend the worm's lifespan by 50 percent — which suggests such diet "tricks" might work for humans too.

May 27, 2016-----News ArchiveLatest research covered daily, archived weekly

Mitochondrial DNA therapy still imperfect
Mitochondrial replacement therapy is a procedure showing promise for preventing inheritance of mitochondrial diseases. However, small amounts of damanaged mtDNA — mitochondrial DNA — are now found to hitch a ride with the transferred nucleus, and recreate mtDNA errors in the baby.

May 26, 2016-----News ArchiveLatest research covered daily, archived weekly

Eating fruit prenatally boosts babies' cognition

A University of Alberta, Canada, study discovers a previously unknown benefit to pregnant moms and their babies — increasing the amount of fruit in moms' diet increases baby's cognitive abilities.

May 25, 2016-----News ArchiveLatest research covered daily, archived weekly

BPA in pregnancy can put baby on course to obesity

Prenatal exposure to Bisphenol A (BPA), a common chemical used in plastic water bottles and canned food, is associated with obesity in children at age 7. Ninetyfour percent of pregnant women studied had detectable levels of BPA, a chemical also used in paper shopping receipts.

May 24, 2016-----News ArchiveLatest research covered daily, archived weekly

Genes for nose shape identified

Genes that drive the shape of human noses have been identified by a University College of London (UCL) study. These four genes affect the width and 'pointiness' of noses which vary greatly between different populations.

May 23, 2016-----News ArchiveLatest research covered daily, archived weekly

Neurons must wriggle to reach their final destination

As our brain develops, microtubules give nerve cells a boost along their way. With attachment help from motor proteins, microtubules send neurons from their birthplace to make a trip towards their final locations. Once there, they pop out axons and dendrites to receive and send sensory signals.

May 20, 2016-----News ArchiveLatest research covered daily, archived weekly

Atlas of Human Malformation Syndromes being created

A photographic resource is being made which will help diagnosis of genomic diseases in patients around the world.

May 19, 2016-----News ArchiveLatest research covered daily, archived weekly

Fathers' age and lifestyle linked to birth defects

A growing body of research reveals an association between a father's age and alcohol use, and birth defects in his children. Georgetown University Medical Center researchers believe these epigenetic alterations can potentially affect multiple generations.

May 18, 2016-----News ArchiveLatest research covered daily, archived weekly

A safe way to deliver drugs to the placenta

For the first time, researchers have devised a way to deliver drugs via a pregnant woman's placenta without harming her fetus. This development could help prevent some premature births and treat conditions such as pre-eclampsia.

May 17, 2016-----News ArchiveLatest research covered daily, archived weekly

Zika causes neural stem cells to self-destruct
A new study reveals human neural stem cells infected with the Zika virus trigger an innate immune response that leads to cell death. The work is adding to the growing number of studies using brain organoids — made from reprogrammed human embryonic stem cells — to understand how the Zika virus leads to microcephaly.

May 16, 2016-----News ArchiveLatest research covered daily, archived weekly

Scientists map brain to decode inner thoughts

Neuroimaging reveals detailed word maps criss-cross the human cerebral cortex, mapping our encounters and "sticking" experiences to verbal cues.

May 13, 2016-----News ArchiveLatest research covered daily, archived weekly

You are what you eat!

Indiana University biologists have mapped genetic pathways in dung beetles to find how maternal nutrition affects developing larva.

May 12, 2016-----News ArchiveLatest research covered daily, archived weekly

Twin study finds gut microbiomes run in families
A United Kingdom genome-wide analysis of over 1,000 twins reveals that parts of our microbiome are shaped not only through the spread of external microbes given from parent to child, but through genetic inheritance.

May 11, 2016-----News ArchiveLatest research covered daily, archived weekly

Another reason to breastfeed

Breast milk supports immune responses in newborns that help the infant's gut become a healthy home to a mix of necessary bacteria.

May 10, 2016-----News ArchiveLatest research covered daily, archived weekly

Breast milk fed preemies show larger brain growth
Preemies fed breast milk developed larger brains by their original due date, than preemies consuming small amounts of breastmilk or none.

May 9, 2016-----News ArchiveLatest research covered daily, archived weekly

An aggregate of protein in nerve cells can cause ALS

People with ALS, can have a genetic mutation causing the protein SOD1 to aggregate in motor neurons of the brain and spinal cord. Research has found that SOD1 injected into mice nerve cells, spreads rapidly and leads to ALS.

May 6, 2016-----News ArchiveLatest research covered daily, archived weekly

How did human limbs evolve?

Sharks, skates, and rays are odd. They have appendages growing out of their gill arch — a small cradle of bones that supports their gills. This peculiarity has led to the idea that our own legs and arms, and longer ago the paired fins of fish, evolved from transforming gill arches in very early fish.

May 5, 2016-----News ArchiveLatest research covered daily, archived weekly

Asynchronous waves key to embryo development
Researchers find wave like timing in stages of cell division act like a switch to regulate formation of the spine.

May 4, 2016-----News ArchiveLatest research covered daily, archived weekly

A cell's 'fuel gauge' promotes healthy development
Salk Institute scientists have found how a cellular "fuel gauge", responsible for monitoring and managing cell energy, has another unexpected role. Without it, cells won't know when to "clean up" or how to recycle cell waste — a forerunner to diabetes and cancer.

May 3, 2016-----News ArchiveLatest research covered daily, archived weekly

Safe, inexpensive chemical reverses progeria

A new finding could lead to treatments for rare genetic illness and normal aging. New work from the University of Maryland suggests that a common, inexpensive and safe chemical called methylene blue could be used to treat progeria — and possibly symptoms of normal aging as well.

May 2, 2016-----News ArchiveLatest research covered daily, archived weekly

Confused cell signals lead to genetic disorders

The scientific and medical community is working to understand how subtle changes in the LMNA gene cause so many genetic disorders of the nerve, heart and muscles, as well as premature aging.

Apr 29, 2016-----News ArchiveLatest research covered daily, archived weekly

Experimental drug cancels affect of Fragile X gene

Study of the most common genetic intellectual disability, Fragile X, has found an experimental drug can reverse — in mice — damage from the gene mutation causing the defect.

Apr 28, 2016-----News ArchiveLatest research covered daily, archived weekly

Preschool nurturing boosts child's brain growth

Mothers' loving support is linked to robust growth of brain area involved in learning, memory, and stress response.

Apr 27, 2016-----News ArchiveLatest research covered daily, archived weekly

Too much 'noise' can affect brain development

Biologists have determined that uncontrolled fluctuations (or "noise) in the derivative of vitamin A , Retinoic acid (RA), can disrupt brain development.


Apr 26, 2016
-----News ArchiveLatest research covered daily, archived weekly

Human patterns follow the same cues as bacteria

Researchers believe the same chemical signals control pattern formation in bacteria and animals. Genetically modified bacteria help explain how all developing animals keep body parts and organs in relative proportion as every other member of its species.

Apr 25, 2016-----News ArchiveLatest research covered daily, archived weekly

The unique biology of human breast milk
Humans may have the most complex breast milk of all mammals. Milk from a human mother contains more than 200 different sugar molecules, way above the average 30-50 found in mouse or cow milk.

Apr 22, 2016------
News ArchiveLatest research covered daily, archived weekly

Clues to how cells repair broken DNA
Our genetic material is stored in the nucleus of each of our cells — protected from constant environmental and metabolic assault. But over a life-time, DNA will suffer damage. Although cells have a host of ways to deal with injury, sometimes things go wrong.

Apr 21, 2016-----News ArchiveLatest research covered daily, archived weekly

First protein crystal structure corrects wrong theory
Reb1 protein binds to DNA sequences, in one instance to control how DNA is transcribed into RNA; in the other, how DNA is replicated before cell division. This is the first time researchers were able to see the crystal form of Reb1 and find that it didn't perform as expected.

Apr 20, 2016-----News ArchiveLatest research covered daily, archived weekly

Deletions on chromosome 22, one cause of autism?
Genomic research has found a portion of chromosome 22 is missing in some autism spectrum disorders (ASD) and may be associated with many other neuropsychiatric disorders.

Apr 19, 2016------
News ArchiveLatest research covered daily, archived weekly

Microvesicles for brain radiation recovery?
Stem cells show promise for treating brain regions damaged by cancer radiation treatment. Now, research has found microscopic vesicles give similar benefit without some stem cell associated risks.

Apr 18, 2016------News ArchiveLatest research covered daily, archived weekly

New type of cell death may help neurons regenerate
A new type of cell death found in C elegans mimics cell death seen in human neurons, and may lead to regenerative therapies for human neuron injury.

Apr 15, 2016------News ArchiveLatest research covered daily, archived weekly

Single-cell embryos can be chimeras
Researchers have found errors in single cell embryos which can lead to entire sets of maternal and paternal chromosomes being unevenly distributed — making them chimeras.

Apr 14, 2016------
News ArchiveLatest research covered daily, archived weekly

Trophoblast cells unlikely entry point for Zika
One theory — that Zika virus enters the developing fetus by passing through the trophoblasts, a layer of placental cells that surround and nurture the fetus — is disproved. But configuring a new mouse model for the disease reveals that type-I interferon resists Zika.

Apr 13, 2016------News ArchiveLatest research covered daily, archived weekly

Gene found in cleft palate defect

Experts feel this discovery will help development of medical approaches to prevent the condition.

Apr 12, 2016------News ArchiveLatest research covered daily, archived weekly

An overfed fetus can become an overweight teen
High levels of certain blood markers in your baby's umbilical cord indicate if your baby has more fat than normal — and if so, suggest that your baby will continue gaining more fat into late childhood and adolescence.

Apr 11, 2016------News ArchiveLatest research covered daily, archived weekly

Three generations affected by one DDT exposure

DDT (dichlorodiphenyltrichloroethane) a weed killer long recognized as a health threat to the human endocrine system — banned in 1972 — is still carried in third and sometimes fourth generation exposed descendants.

Apr 8, 2016------News ArchiveLatest research covered daily, archived weekly

How early female human embryo controls X
There are considerable differences in embryo development between humans and mice, the most commonly used animal model. Research reveals human X chromosome genes are regulated differently.

Apr 7, 2016------News ArchiveLatest research covered daily, archived weekly

Abnormalities in early embryos may self correct

Abnormal cells in the early embryo are not necessarily a sign the baby will be born with a birth defect, suggests new research in mice from the University of Cambridge.

Apr 6, 2016
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News ArchiveLatest research covered daily, archived weekly

How to prevent asthma in your newborn?
The best way to reduce a child's chances of developing asthma might be to make sure mom has enough vitamin D during her second trimester.

Apr 5, 2016------News ArchiveLatest research covered daily, archived weekly

Protein on neural stem cell is hijacked by Zika virus
Zika is attracted to human neural stem cells, perhaps because it can hijack a protein found on the surface of those cells and use it to enter the cell.

Apr 4, 2016------News ArchiveLatest research covered daily, archived weekly

Fragile X in mice responds to experimental drug
Fragile X Syndrome (FXS) is an inherited cause of intellectual disability, especially in boys. Cognitive impairment in neuro-developmental disorders like FXS is thought to be due to changes in the brain which alter synaptic connections.

Apr 1, 2016------News ArchiveLatest research covered daily, archived weekly

Born to run?

A new study suggests love of exercise starts in the womb. Baylor College of Medicine research has found that female mice that voluntarily exercise during pregnancy, have pups more physically active as adults.

Mar 31, 2016------News ArchiveLatest research covered daily, archived weekly

Unraveling stem cells

Neuroscientists document the first steps in the process of a stem cell transforming into a different cell type.

Mar 30, 2016------News ArchiveLatest research covered daily, archived weekly

Rewrite the text books!
We know alot about how embryos develop, but how they implant into the uterus - has remained a mystery. Now, scientists from Cambridge have discovered a way to study and film this 'black box' of development.

Mar 29, 2016------News ArchiveLatest research covered daily, archived weekly

Fetal or placental cells?
Genetic 'signatures' of early-stage embryos confirm development begins as early as the second day after conception, when we are a mere four cells. According to new research, even though appearing to be identical, two day-old embryo cells have subtle — but important differences.

Mar 28, 2016------News ArchiveLatest research covered daily, archived weekly

Precision medicine targets Lupus

Precision medicine is developing as a new field to deliver highly personalized health care. In order to proceed, it must understand how individual genes, environment and lifestyle impact any disease that may affect a patient.

Mar 25, 2016------News ArchiveLatest research covered daily, archived weekly

Cell 'rejuvenation' relies on telomeres

Scientists have discovered the protein Zscan4, once believed to affect stem cell pluripotency, is actually a cell repair mechanism triggered by cell division.

Mar 24, 2016------News ArchiveLatest research covered daily, archived weekly

PKU effect on brain more extensive than thought
The "heel stick" test is given at birth to every infant in the USA in order to detect Phenylketonuria (PKU). One in 10,000 children are found to have PKU, which is then treated through a restricted diet. Its rarity and relative ease of treatment has lead PKU to seldom be studied since the late 1960s.

Mar 23, 2016------News ArchiveLatest research covered daily, archived weekly

A possible treatment for autism-like symptoms

The anti-anxiety drug clonazepam reduces autistic behaviors in mice with Jacobsen syndrome. About half of children born with Jacobsen, a rare inherited disorder, experience social and behavioral issues found in autism spectrum disorders.

Mar 22, 2016------News ArchiveLatest research covered daily, archived weekly

Complex learning dismantles barriers in the brain
By learning a complex task over an extended period of time, each of us has the power to break down barriers in our brains once thought to be permanent.

Mar 21, 2016------News ArchiveLatest research covered daily, archived weekly

Can we turn off Alzheimer's disease?

Russian scientists have found a 'trigger' to Alzheimer's. By figuring out the steps involved in it's development, they may possibly have determined the trigger event beginning the conversion of normal proteins into the plaques of Alzheimer's.

Mar 18, 2016------News ArchiveLatest research covered daily, archived weekly

A new kind of stem cell?
Scientists at Michigan State University have discovered properties in stem cell "garbage" that may advance regenerative medicine and ways to study birth defects.

Mar 17, 2016------News ArchiveLatest research covered daily, archived weekly

Genes can cause neurological diseases

Spinocerebellar ataxia (SCA) is a genetic disease that causes wasting away of the cerebellum — the portion of our brain responsible for controlling voluntary muscle movement, like walking, speaking, even the direction our eyes move.

Mar 16, 2016------News ArchiveLatest research covered daily, archived weekly

Brown fat in adults follows circadian rhythm
A baby's brown fat is known to protect it from cold temperatures. Now research has discovered brown fat in some adults also follows our circadian rhythm and may offer protection from cold and from diabetes.

Mar 15, 2016------News ArchiveLatest research covered daily, archived weekly

Mom's bacterial infection can change fetal brain

St. Jude Children's Research Hospital discovers how pieces of bacteria cross the placenta and alter fetal brain anatomy affecting cognitive function after birth.

Mar 14, 2016------News ArchiveLatest research covered daily, archived weekly

Zika virus breakthrough
Florida State University research has found that the Zika virus creates birth defects by specifically targeting and stunting the growth of developing brain cells.

Mar 11, 2016------News ArchiveLatest research covered daily, archived weekly

Lack of stem cells causes recurring miscarriages

Scientists at the University of Warwick have discovered that a lack of stem cells in the womb lining is causing thousands of women to suffer from recurrent miscarriages.

Mar 10, 2016------News ArchiveLatest research covered daily, archived weekly

A first: earliest stages of human stem cell lines

Scientists in the United Kingdom show it is possible to create so-called 'naïve' pluripotent stem cells from a human embryo. 'Naïve' pluripotent stem cells are the most flexible stem cells, and can develop into all human tissue except the placenta.

Mar 9, 2016------News ArchiveLatest research covered daily, archived weekly

One microRNA may affect many neuro disorders

Only discovered in the 1990s, microRNAs are short molecules working within virtually all of our cells. New research now identifies one with strong links to a number of neuropsychiatric disorders, including autism.

Mar 8, 2016------News ArchiveLatest research covered daily, archived weekly

Common gene links obesity to diabetes

The P53 tumor suppressor gene helps every bit of our general metabolism work. A new study reveals how it may have come about in our early ancestors — and how when mutated, it turns into cancer.

Mar 7, 2016------News ArchiveLatest research covered daily, archived weekly

Perception of constant stress is passed on...
For decades science has shown environmental stress experienced in one generation induces change in the biochemistry affecting the next generation. But how ecological conditions stimulate such responses — with differing results in multiple species — is perplexing.

Mar 4, 2016------News ArchiveLatest research covered daily, archived weekly

Snail shells help solve origins of body symmetry

An international team has found the gene that determines whether a snail shell will twist clockwise or counter-clockwise. This same gene may affect our own body symmetry.

Mar 3, 2016------News ArchiveLatest research covered daily, archived weekly

Trimmer snips jumping genes

A Pac-Man-like enzyme called "Trimmer," protects sperm and eggs from genetic rewriting by our "jumping genes."

Mar 2, 2016------News ArchiveLatest research covered daily, archived weekly

Mom's high alcohol level disrupts neonatal brain

Slow-wave sleep — or deep sleep which converts daily events into permanent memories — is fragmented in adults exposed to high levels of alcohol in the womb.

Mar 1, 2016------News ArchiveLatest research covered daily, archived weekly

Amino acids help kids overcome fetal malnutrition

Inadequate essential Amino Acids lead to stunted growth in millions. Worldwide, an estimated 25 percent of children under age 5 suffer from stunted growth and development.

Feb 29, 2016------News ArchiveLatest research covered daily, archived weekly

Zika virus linked to stillbirth, loss of brain tissue

In January came the first case associating Zika virus to damage outside the central nervous system. An infected Brazilian woman gave birth to a stillborn baby with signs of severe tissue swelling and central nervous system defects causing near total brain loss.

Feb 26, 2016------News ArchiveLatest research covered daily, archived weekly

How to regenerate peripheral nerves

Controlling the timing of immune response to nerve damage may be key to promoting nerve cell repair.

Feb 25, 2016------News ArchiveLatest research covered daily, archived weekly

How the nervous system trims its branches
As tiny embryos, we start out with a lot more neuronal material than we actually need. During development, our body drastically prunes excess by cutting branches from nerves — axons — and sometimes entire neurons.

Feb 24, 2016------News ArchiveLatest research covered daily, archived weekly

Teaching stem cells to build muscle

New research shows young muscle stem cells can "teach" adult muscle cells to regenerate. Scientists have found a key to enhancing repair of damaged muscle.

Feb 23, 2016------News ArchiveLatest research covered daily, archived weekly

'Pump' mechanism splits DNA for copying by RNA

High-resolution images offer new insight into the structure of the replisome, a molecular protein machine that unwinds, splits, and copies double-stranded DNA.

Feb 22, 2016------News ArchiveLatest research covered daily, archived weekly

Stressed dads give offspring high blood sugar
Mouse fathers under psychological stress were more likely to have offspring with high blood sugar than unstressed dads.

Feb 19, 2016------News ArchiveLatest research covered daily, archived weekly

Cell division errors: infertility, disorders and cancers
New insight into faulty cell formation helps us understand why congenital disorders such as Down's syndrome and perhaps infertility occur.

Feb 18, 2016
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Copper key to brain cell development
Chemical change spurs the rapid transport of copper. Researchers at Johns Hopkins used a precision sensor in a chicken embryo and found dramatic differences between the use of copper in developing and fully mature neurons.

Feb 17, 2016-----News ArchiveLatest research covered daily, archived weekly

Bioelectric signals influence facial symmetry

A rare genetic disorder may also shed light on fetal alcohol syndrome and other fetal conditions of facial symmetry.

Feb 16, 2016-----News ArchiveLatest research covered daily, archived weekly

Potential to treat hypertrophic cardiomyopathy
More than 15 years ago, researchers discovered the precise malfunction of a specific protein in the heart that leads to hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM), a common culprit in the sudden death of young athletes.

Feb 15, 2016-----News ArchiveLatest research covered daily, archived weekly

Fluorescent proteins light up living cells
Tracing proteins in cells is like looking for a needle in a haystack. But, in order to locate such proteins and decipher their function in living cells, researchers can now label them with fluorescent molecules.

Feb 12, 2016-----News ArchiveLatest research covered daily, archived weekly

Tuning the volume on gene expression

Research finds genes can be turned on and off, or finely adjusted as if controlled by a volume control knob.

Feb 11, 2016-----News ArchiveLatest research covered daily, archived weekly

Linking fetal to adult brain disorders

Using mice as their model animal, scientists have outlined the possible mechanics behind some common neurodevelopment disorders.

Feb 10, 2016-----News ArchiveLatest research covered daily, archived weekly

A quick, simple way to generate neural crest cells
Research led by the School of Medicine at the University of California, Riverside (UC Riverside) provides a quick, simple and trackable way to generate neural crest cells.

Feb 9, 2016-----News ArchiveLatest research covered daily, archived weekly

New drug target for Rett syndrome

Researchers have identified a faulty neural pathway that can be corrected in mice to releave symptoms of Rett syndrome.

Feb 8, 2016-----News ArchiveLatest research covered daily, archived weekly

RNA quick — Protein slow

A team of scientists has uncovered intricate signaling as it applies to making RNA and proteins. Both occur almost at the same moment, but at two unique frequencies.

Feb 5, 2016-----News ArchiveLatest research covered daily, archived weekly

Mitochondria trigger cell aging

Our cell batteries also trigger our aging! An international team of scientists has for the first time shown that mitochondria, the batteries of the cells, are essential for ageing.

Feb 4, 2016-----News ArchiveLatest research covered daily, archived weekly

How to precisely regulate RNA polymerase?

Scientists have developed a way to analyze and modify phosphorylation sites on the RNA polymerase II enzyme, which is responsible for copying and expressing (turning on) genes.

Feb 3, 2016-----News ArchiveLatest research covered daily, archived weekly

New app helps doctors predict preterm birth

A new app called QUiPP can help doctors better identify women at risk of giving premature birth. Developed at King's College London, the app was tested in two studies of high-risk women monitored at ante-natal clinics.

Feb 2, 2016-----News ArchiveLatest research covered daily, archived weekly

Found - protein that turns off biological clock

A protein associated with many kinds of cancer cells, can suppress the circadian clock running every cell's 24 hour cycle. This result has implications not only for cancer treatment, but for re-working the clock itself.

Feb 1, 2016-----News ArchiveLatest research covered daily, archived weekly

Virus in pregnancy causes autism-like behavior

A new study in pregnant mice suggests that blocking immune reaction to a virus, can restore normal brain structures in mice pups that would otherwise be damaged by a mother's inflammatory response.

Jan 29, 2016-----News ArchiveLatest research covered daily, archived weekly

A gene that allows for a new species?
Between different species, each with their own specific number of chromosomes, any offspring will be infertile or unable to survive. However, scientists were able to inter-breed two species of fruit flies by knocking out one gene — "gfzf."

Jan 28, 2016-----News ArchiveLatest research covered daily, archived weekly

3 Autism-linked molecules wire up neurons

New research from Duke University reveals how three proteins work together to wire up a specific area of the brain responsible for processing sensory input.

Jan 27, 2016-----News ArchiveLatest research covered daily, archived weekly

Donor's genome impacts iPS cell outcomes
Induced pluripotent stem cells [iPS cells] made from different body cells are equally capable of being reprogrammed — no matter what organ cells they originated from. But, the genotype of a donor does affect their differentiation behavior, according to a recent study from Finland.

Jan 26, 2016-----News ArchiveLatest research covered daily, archived weekly

What you eat can influence how you sleep
A new study suggests that your daily intake of fiber, saturated fat and sugar may impact your quality of sleep.

Jan 25, 2016-----News ArchiveLatest research covered daily, archived weekly

Brain receptor regulates fat burning in cells
Decreasing levels of the neurotrophin p75 receptor prevented obesity and metabolic disease in mice who were fed a high-fat diet.

Jan 22, 2016
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News ArchiveLatest research covered daily, archived weekly

Diverse gut microbes increase infection resistance
Spending time in close contact with others often means risking catching germs and getting sick. But being sociable can also transmit 'good' microbes, finds a study in chimpanzees.

Jan 21, 2016-----News ArchiveLatest research covered daily, archived weekly

Zika virus, linked to birth defects, is spreading
The Zika virus, possibly linked to serious birth defects in Brazil, has the potential to spread within the Americas, including parts of the United States, according to an international team of researchers tracking the spread of infectious diseases.

Jan 20, 2016-----
News ArchiveLatest research covered daily, archived weekly

Eat fish in pregnancy to improve baby's brain

Researchers at Tohoku University's School of Medicine have found why eating fish during pregnancy correlates with the health of the baby's brain.

Jan 19, 2016-----News ArchiveLatest research covered daily, archived weekly

Turning epigenetic marks OFF!

Epigenetics is defined as heritable changes made to a gene. But these changes are not in the DNA sequence itself — they come from methyl groups added to the DNA strand. Now, research has identified 2 proteins that can remove methylation marks from DNA.

Jan 18, 2016-----News ArchiveLatest research covered daily, archived weekly

Cell signal strength turns on early stem cells
Stem cells work like handymen, repairing damaged tissues and renewing other tissues such as our skin. Scientists understand more about how stem cells work in adults, but less about how they work in an embryo.

Jan 15, 2016-----News ArchiveLatest research covered daily, archived weekly

Slow stem cell division causes small brain?
Duke University research has followed the development of microcephaly, which produces a much smaller brain than normal, to find stem cells were simply moving too slowly when constructing neurons in affected brains.

Jan 14, 2016-----News ArchiveLatest research covered daily, archived weekly

Healing muscular dystrophy with CRISPR
The red-hot genome editing tool known as CRISPR has scored another achievement — researchers have used it to treat a severe form of muscular dystrophy in mice.

Jan 13, 2016-----News ArchiveLatest research covered daily, archived weekly

Of protein kinases, embryos and cancer
Protein kinases play an important role in how embryos develop. They also are becoming targets for cancer research.

Jan 12, 2016-----News ArchiveLatest research covered daily, archived weekly

Can having more children slow down aging?
A study by Simon Fraser University suggests that the number of children born to a woman influences the rate at which her body ages — for the better!

Jan 11, 2016-----News ArchiveLatest research covered daily, archived weekly

Uterine microorganisms may set stage for disease

Experts review the potential influence of a developing infant's microbiome on its' own potential birth defects and childhood diseases.

Jan 8, 2016-----News ArchiveLatest research covered daily, archived weekly

A mathematical model for animal stripes
The back of a tiger could have been a blank canvas. Instead, nature painted the big cat with parallel stripes, evenly spaced and perpendicular to its' spine. Scientists don't know exactly how stripes develop, but mathematicians since the 1950s have been modeling possible scenarios.

Jan 7, 2016-----News ArchiveLatest research covered daily, archived weekly

Physics attempts to explain why stem cells move

Research has shed light on the complex interactions of stem cells and molecular diffusion in brain tissue. The calculations may explain phenomena such as stem cell differentiation and even the formation of the cortex of our brain.

Jan 6, 2016-----News ArchiveLatest research covered daily, archived weekly

Epigenetic change leads to cerebellum circuitry
Before birth and throughout childhood connections form and continue to form between neurons in the brain. To date, scientists have a pretty good understanding of how these circuits functionally get set up. But, they don't know how much is the result of our DNA template — and how much is epigenetic.

Jan 5, 2016-----News ArchiveLatest research covered daily, archived weekly

Id tags define developing neural circuits
The human brain is composed of circuits made up of neurons, cells specialized to transmit information via electrochemical signals. Like the circuits in a computer, these neuronal circuits must connect in very unique ways in order to function. But with billions in a single human brain, how does a neuron make the right connection with the right cell?

Jan 4, 2016-----News ArchiveLatest research covered daily, archived weekly

Mechanism for how organs branch found
The lung is as much a natural work of art as a functioning organ with its twisting bronchial branches and delicate curls. Now Princeton researchers have observed this artistry unfold. While growing mouse embryo lungs, they arrived at a surprising conclusion about forces to help shape lungs.

Jan 1, 2016-----News ArchiveLatest research covered daily, archived weekly

How to multiply teeth!

Teeth are a major target of regenerative medicine. Research has now found a way to — literally — multiply their number. Testing in mice, researchers extracted teeth germs — groups of cells formed early in development that grow into teeth, split them in two, and then re-implant them into mice jaws to develop into fully functional teeth

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