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Welcome to The Visible Embryo, a comprehensive educational resource on human development from conception to birth.

The Visible Embryo provides visual references for changes in fetal development throughout pregnancy and can be navigated via fetal development or maternal changes.

The National Institutes of Child Health and Human Development awarded Phase I and Phase II Small Business Innovative Research Grants to develop The Visible Embryo in 1993 as a first generation internet teaching tool consolidating human embryology teaching for first year medical students.

Today, The Visible Embryo is linked to over 600 educational institutions and is viewed by more than 1 million visitors each month. The field of early embryology has grown to include the identification of the stem cell as not only critical to organogenesis in the embryo, but equally critical to organ function and repair in the adult human. The identification and understanding of genetic malfunction, inflammatory responses, and the progression in chronic disease, begins with a grounding in primary cellular and systemic functions manifested in the study of the early embryo.


WHO International Clinical Trials Registry Platform


The World Health Organization (WHO) has created a new Web site to help researchers, doctors and patients obtain reliable information on high-quality clinical trials. Now you can go to one website and search all registers to identify clinical trial research underway around the world!



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Disclaimer: The Visible Embryo web site is provided for your general information only. The information contained on this site should not be treated as a substitute for medical, legal or other professional advice. Neither is The Visible Embryo responsible or liable for the contents of any websites of third parties which are listed on this site.
Content protected under a Creative Commons License.

No dirivative works may be made or used for commercial purposes.

 
Pregnancy Timeline by SemestersFetal liver is producing blood cellsHead may position into pelvisBrain convolutions beginFull TermWhite fat begins to be madeWhite fat begins to be madeHead may position into pelvisImmune system beginningImmune system beginningPeriod of rapid brain growthBrain convolutions beginLungs begin to produce surfactantSensory brain waves begin to activateSensory brain waves begin to activateInner Ear Bones HardenBone marrow starts making blood cellsBone marrow starts making blood cellsBrown fat surrounds lymphatic systemFetal sexual organs visibleFinger and toe prints appearFinger and toe prints appearHeartbeat can be detectedHeartbeat can be detectedBasic Brain Structure in PlaceThe Appearance of SomitesFirst Detectable Brain WavesA Four Chambered HeartBeginning Cerebral HemispheresFemale Reproductive SystemEnd of Embryonic PeriodEnd of Embryonic PeriodFirst Thin Layer of Skin AppearsThird TrimesterSecond TrimesterFirst TrimesterFertilizationDevelopmental Timeline
Click on weeks 0 - 40 to follow fetal growth every two weeks
Google Search artcles published since 2007
 
Home-   -History-  -Bibliography-   -Pregnancy TimelinePrescription Drugs  -    Pregnancy Calculator -    Reproductive System- -  News Alerts

 

Dec 19, 2014-----News ArchiveLatest research covered daily, archived weekly

When sperm meets egg - FIREWORKS in zinc!
Sparks literally fly when a sperm and an egg hit it off. The fertilized mammalian egg releases billions of zinc atoms in "zinc sparks," one wave after another.

Dec 18, 2014-----News ArchiveLatest research covered daily, archived weekly

Paxil — antidepressant has a hidden toxicity
Because of undetected toxicity, about a third of prescription drugs approved in the U.S. are withdrawn from the market or require added warning labels upon reaching the market. A new test aims to detect dangerous side effects much earlier.

Dec 17, 2014-----News ArchiveLatest research covered daily, archived weekly

Intestinal tract helps control weight
Scientists have identified an unexpected intestinal bacterial interaction potentially affecting the human development of obesity and diabetes type 2.

Dec 16, 2014-----News ArchiveLatest research covered daily, archived weekly

Strategy for treating neurofibromatosis type 1
Researchers have identified a possible therapy to treat neurofibromatosis type 1 or NF1, a childhood neurological disease which can cause learning deficits and autism.

Dec 15, 2014-----News ArchiveLatest research covered daily, archived weekly

3-D maps reveal genes follow 'origami' like folds
In a triumph for cell biology, researchers assembled the first high-resolution 3-D maps of entire folded genomes. These maps reveal a new basis for gene regulation — a kind of "genomic origami". The gene's structure allows for the same genome to fold and refold in order to produce different types of cells.

Dec 12, 2014-----News ArchiveLatest research covered daily, archived weekly

PCBs may affect fetal brain
A new study provides the strongest evidence to date that endocrine disrupting chemicals such as PCBs (polychlorinated biphenyls) can interfere with thyroid hormone in pregnant women and may travel across the placenta to affect the fetus.

Dec 11, 2014-----News ArchiveLatest research covered daily, archived weekly

Discovered, stem cell code for specific tissue types
By analyzing the genetic makeup of individual stem cells, researchers have identified new ways to regulate and control the growth of various cell and tissue types.

Dec 10, 2014-----News ArchiveLatest research covered daily, archived weekly

Scientists identify principal sensor for touch
A team led by biologists at The Scripps Research Institute (TSRI) has solved a long-standing mystery in neuroscience by finding the "mechano-receptor" protein mediating the sense of touch.

Dec 9, 2014-----News ArchiveLatest research covered daily, archived weekly

"Designer" genes correct Muscular Dystrophy
Researchers use one patient's induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells and laboratory created "gene cutters" to correct genetic mutation causing Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD).

Dec 8, 2014-----News ArchiveLatest research covered daily, archived weekly

Sperm quality decreases with age
Prior evidence regarding men’s semen quality declining with age — lowering their fertility — is now established by a new review of data from 90 previous studies done around the world.

Dec 5, 2014-----News ArchiveLatest research covered daily, archived weekly

Boys are more likely to be stillborn than girls
A large-scale study has found that boys are more likely to be stillborn than girls. The study reviewed more than 30 million births globally, and found the risk for stillbirth is about ten percent higher in boys. This equals a loss of about 100 000 male babies per year.

Dec 4, 2014-----News ArchiveLatest research covered daily, archived weekly

Excess protein may trigger schizophrenia
Rutgers researcher observe too much protein causes brain abnormalities and faulty connections during laboratory studies.

Dec 3, 2014-----News ArchiveLatest research covered daily, archived weekly

Folic acid before pregnancy reduces SGA babies
Taking folic acid before conception significantly reduces the risk of small for gestational age (SGA) babies at birth.

Dec 2, 2014-----News ArchiveLatest research covered daily, archived weekly

Evolutionary controls seen in thousands of genes
Data from the Mouse ENCODE project reveals a comprehensive list of some 6600 genes where the number of "turned on" genes exists within a restricted range for both mice and humans.

Dec 1, 2014-----News ArchiveLatest research covered daily, archived weekly

Two-cell embryos already "talk" about their future
Bioengineers have uncovered that mouse embryos immediately make decisions on their cell fate when only two to four cells in number. This discovery challenges the scientific consensus of when embryonic cells begin differentiating into cell types.

Nov 28, 2014-----News ArchiveLatest research covered daily, archived weekly

Women's fertility linked to selenium in diet
Selenium is a natural antioxidant and is now found critical to female fertility.

Nov 27, 2014-----News ArchiveLatest research covered daily, archived weekly

Mom's presence changes genes in infant brain
A mother's tender loving care, her "TLC", can not only help soothe infants in pain, but may actually impact early brain development by altering gene activity in the amygdala.

Nov 26, 2014-----News ArchiveLatest research covered daily, archived weekly

A gene mutation that alters the male fetus
Case Western Reserve researchers have identified a mutation in SRY protein that alters male gonad formation before birth.

Nov 25, 2014-----News ArchiveLatest research covered daily, archived weekly

Molecular signal turns on stem cells in brain
Researchers have succeeded in identifying how a molecule in the brain "turns on" stem cells at different stages in brain development.

Nov 24, 2014-----News ArchiveLatest research covered daily, archived weekly

Finding "lost" languages in the brain
An infant’s mother tongue creates neural patterns that an unconscious brain retains years later even if a child totally stops using the language — as can happen in cases of international adoption.

Nov 21, 2014
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News ArchiveLatest research covered daily, archived weekly

A potential way to restore hearing
Harnessing the regenerative power of early support cells could lead to new strategies to combat many causes of deafness.

Nov 20, 2014-----News ArchiveLatest research covered daily, archived weekly

Making cells self-renewing
Pluripotent stem cells are immortal — in the lab. In a laboratory they are able to divide and grow indefinitely under the right conditions. This quality may also exist with progenitor cells, those cells in the first stages of creating each new tissue.

Nov 19, 2014-----News ArchiveLatest research covered daily, archived weekly

The science behind Total Memory Recall
Is it possible to change the amount of information the brain can store? Maybe, according to a new international study led by the Research Institute of the McGill University Health Centre (RI-MUHC).

Nov 18, 2014-----News ArchiveLatest research covered daily, archived weekly

How the male brain is molded
Researchers have discovered that neural circuitry previously identified as vital for triggering ovulation and maintaining fertility also is key to moulding the male brain.

Nov 17, 2014-----News ArchiveLatest research covered daily, archived weekly

Resetting a woman's biological clock
Neutralizing an immune system gene could improve fertility treatments for older women.

Nov 14, 2014-----News ArchiveLatest research covered daily, archived weekly

How cells know which way to go
Amoebas aren't the only cells that crawl: Movement is crucial to development, wound healing and immune response, not to mention cancer metastasis. Two new studies shed light on how cells sense and respond to chemical trails.

Nov 13, 2014-----News ArchiveLatest research covered daily, archived weekly

Human stomach created from pluripotent stem cells
For the first time, scientists using pluripotent stem cells, have generated functioning, three-dimensional, human stomach tissue in a laboratory. This work has created a new tool for studying how tissues develop and how infection and disease create change.

Nov 12, 2014-----News ArchiveLatest research covered daily, archived weekly

Clues to genetics of heart defects in Downs
The risk of atrioventricular septal defect — AVSD— is higher in children with Down syndrome. In AVSD, the central region of the heart fails to separate the atria from the ventricles.

Nov 11, 2014-----News ArchiveLatest research covered daily, archived weekly

Sugars help us differentiate seasons

Scientists have discovered how a single hormone manages to trigger two different physiologic functions — the sensing of season changes and functional metabolism, without any mixup.

Nov 10, 2014-----News ArchiveLatest research covered daily, archived weekly

Prematurity may explain some neurological risks
Premature birth occurs before many brain’s structures are fully developed and appears to disturb the brain’s neuro-circuitry. Premature babies have a higher risk for Attention Deficit Hyperactivity and Autism Spectrum Disorders.

Nov 7, 2014------News ArchiveLatest research covered daily, archived weekly

Constructing embryos from stem cells
Researchers at the University of Cambridge have reconstructed the earliest stages of mammalian development using embryonic stem cells. Their work reveals how a critical mass of cells is needed before self-organization can begin and an embryo form.

Nov 6, 2014------News ArchiveLatest research covered daily, archived weekly

Spontaneous genetic errors found to cause autism
Genetic mutations can arise "spontaneously" and do not have to occur in either parent in order to contribute to a child's autism.

Nov 5, 2014------News ArchiveLatest research covered daily, archived weekly

Cash register receipts are high in Bisphenol A (BPA)
BPA from thermal paper used in cash register receipts accounts for high levels of BPA in humans. And the use of skin care products dramatically increases BPA absorption.

Nov 4, 2014------News ArchiveLatest research covered daily, archived weekly

Fetal BPA exposure increases adult food allergies
New research suggests exposure to Bisphenol A — at a dose significantly below the FDA Tolerable Daily Intake — predisposes children to food intollerance and food allergies as adults.

Nov 3, 2014------News ArchiveLatest research covered daily, archived weekly

Baby cries reveal cocaine exposure in pregnancy
The cries of babies whose mothers used cocaine during pregnancy have a high-pitched vibration — 'hyperphonation' — in their voices.

Oct 31, 2014------News ArchiveLatest research covered daily, archived weekly

Infants pick up social cues from your eyes
Humans are the only primates with large, highly visible sclera — the white part of your eye. Eyes play a significant role in our expressiveness — and how much sclera is showing can indicate either positive or negative emotions and attitude.

Oct 30, 2014------News ArchiveLatest research covered daily, archived weekly

Down syndrome develops into Alzheimer's
The process that leads to brain structure changes in individuals with Down's, is the same that causes dementia in Alzheimer's patients. Understanding the steps involved in this process may lead to treatments for these conditions.

Oct 29, 2014------News ArchiveLatest research covered daily, archived weekly

A kid’s genes and moms’ risk for rheumatoid arthritis
A child’s genetic makeup may contribute to his or her mom's risk of rheumatoid arthritis, possibly explaining why women are more at risk for developing the disease than men.

Oct 28, 2014------News ArchiveLatest research covered daily, archived weekly

'Paradigm shift' explains potassium channels
A new discovery is being described as a 'paradigm shift' in understanding how ions pass through cell walls.

Oct 27, 2014------News ArchiveLatest research covered daily, archived weekly

Recipe to make bone and cartilage
Scientists have combined small molecules from several mouse embryos and made bone and cartilage. This new method is a promising approach for repairing defects in human bone and cartilage.

Oct 24, 2014------News ArchiveLatest research covered daily, archived weekly

Mitochondrial errors in children of older moms
Dozens of rare diseases are known to result from mitochondrial dysfunction. In others — including Alzheimer's, autism, some cancers, cardiovascular disease, Parkinson's, and type 2 diabetes — errors in mitochondria are suspected.

Oct 23, 2014------News ArchiveLatest research covered daily, archived weekly

Neurons “fine tune” themselves at gene level
A new study provides the first biological evidence that neurons continually “tune” their molecular machinery to regulate the flow of ions and the electrical charge neurons carry.

Oct 22, 2014------News ArchiveLatest research covered daily, archived weekly

Broccoli sprouts show promise in treating autism
Results of a small clinical trial suggest a chemical derived from broccoli sprouts may ease classic behavioral symptoms in those with autism spectrum disorders (ASDs).

Oct 21, 2014------News ArchiveLatest research covered daily, archived weekly

PCBs can change thyroid hormone during pregnancy
Flame retardant chemicals called polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) can infiltrate the placenta during pregnancy and negatively affect development of the fetal brain.

Oct 20, 2014
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News ArchiveLatest research covered daily, archived weekly

Rett syndrome mice improve with diet
Study of rodents with Rett syndrome (an autism spectrum disorder) suggests potential for diet intervention. Mice on the special diet lived longer than mice on regular diets and their physical and behavioral symptoms were less severe.

Oct 17, 2014------News ArchiveLatest research covered daily, archived weekly

Teens exposed to THC may 'waste' their immune systems
New research suggests that early exposure to marijuana can negatively affect development of the immune system, leading to immune-related diseases in adults.

Oct 16, 2014------News ArchiveLatest research covered daily, archived weekly

Cancer drug eases mental illness in mice
Johns Hopkins research reports an anticancer drug helps "unwind" DNA in mice with a mental disorder similar to that found in Kabuki syndrome — an inherited intellectual disorder of humans — improving memory function of those mice.

Oct 15, 2014------News ArchiveLatest research covered daily, archived weekly

How a gene change causes childhood eye tumors
Retinoblastoma is a childhood tumor of the retina usually affecting children one to two years old. Although rare, it is the most common malignant tumor of the eye in children.

Oct 14, 2014------News ArchiveLatest research covered daily, archived weekly

Virus in Utero May Trigger Childhood Diabetes
The incidence of type 1 childhood diabetes has been increasing rapidly worldwide. The exact cause of juvenile diabetes has eluded scientists, but a new study from Tel Aviv University (TAU) suggests a possible trigger before birth.

Oct 13, 2014------News ArchiveLatest research covered daily, archived weekly

Contaminated water and pregnancy complications
Prenatal exposure to tetrachloroethylene (PCE) in drinking water may increase the risk of stillbirth and placental abruption, according to a new study led by Boston University School of Public Health.

Oct 10, 2014------News ArchiveLatest research covered daily, archived weekly

How tissue grows
Carnegie Mellon engineers make a key discovery about how cells communicate, finding that mechanics must combine with biology to make tissues grow.

Oct 9, 2014------News ArchiveLatest research covered daily, archived weekly

Bad signal to Sonic Hedgehog creates child brain tumors
A protein named Boc is needed to signal the gene Sonic Hedgehog to begin cell divisions resulting in specific tissues in very specific patterns. However, an error in Boc over stimulates Sonic Hedgehog to over promote cell growth in the brains of children.

Oct 8, 2014------News ArchiveLatest research covered daily, archived weekly

Gene error affects immunity and facial development
How a face forms — or misforms — during early development is still being discovered. Recent research has begun to unwind some of the mystery of how cells migrate into position to become major facial structures AND part of our immune system.

Oct 7, 2014------News ArchiveLatest research covered daily, archived weekly

How to place a chemical tag to control a gene
Biochemists have developed a program that predicts where to place chemical tags to control gene activity.

Oct 6, 2014------News ArchiveLatest research covered daily, archived weekly

Discovered, an On/Off switch for aging
Scientists at the Salk Institute have discovered an on-and-off “switch” in cells that may hold the key to healthy aging. This switch may give us a way to encourage healthy cells to keep dividing and regenerating, such as in creating new lung tissue in old age, or in regenerating lung tissue after disease.

Oct 3, 2014
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News ArchiveLatest research covered daily, archived weekly

Don’t drink from (warm) plastic bottles!
America take warning from a University of Florida study of bottled water in China. Don’t drink a liquid if you’ve left it somewhere warm for a long time — like the trunk of your car. Plastic bottles are made of polyethylene terephthalate and when heated "leak" two toxic chemicals: antimony and bisphenol A — or BPA.

Oct 2, 2014------News ArchiveLatest research covered daily, archived weekly

Improving language before a baby can speak
In the first months of life, babies begin to distinguish sounds of language from all other sounds. According to new research, babies might be able to be trained to recognize sounds taht "might" be language more effectively. This research could help build brain maps critical to acquiring language and processing it.

Oct 1, 2014------News ArchiveLatest research covered daily, archived weekly

Ear 'hair' cells need precise alignment to work
Our inner ear is lined with 'hair' cells that translate sound waves into electrical impulses. These impulses are carried to the brain to be interpreted as individual sounds. But if the arrangement of ear 'hair' cells is disordered, impulses are disorganized and our hearing is impaired — or lost. 

Sept 30, 2014------News ArchiveLatest research covered daily, archived weekly

Green neighborhoods mean better birth weights
Mothers who live in neighborhoods with plenty of grass, trees or other green vegetation are more likely to deliver at full term and their babies are born at higher weights, compared to mothers who live in urban areas that aren’t as green, a new study shows.

Sept 29, 2014------News ArchiveLatest research covered daily, archived weekly

Breast versus bottle feeding
Infant rhesus monkeys receiving different diets after birth develop distinct immune systems. As we are also primates, these results relate to humans as well.

Sept 26, 2014------News ArchiveLatest research covered daily, archived weekly

Breast milk protects infant from intestinal disorder
Growth factor found in breast milk protects against devastating intestinal disorder of newborn infants — necrotizing enterocolitis, or NEC.

Sept 25, 2014------News ArchiveLatest research covered daily, archived weekly

First international standards for infants/newborns
The FIRST international standards for fetal growth and newborn size have been developed by a global team led by scientists from Oxford University.The standards depict a desirable pattern of healthy growth for all babies everywhere, regardless of their ethnicity or country of birth.

Sept 24, 2014------News ArchiveLatest research covered daily, archived weekly

Phthalates heighten risk for childhood asthma
Children born to pregnant women exposed to high levels of household chemicals — butylbenzyl phthalate and di-n-butyl phthalate (pronounced THAL-ates) — had more than a 70 percent increase in asthma.

Sept 23, 2014------News ArchiveLatest research covered daily, archived weekly

Vitamin E critical during first 1,000 days of life
Amid conflicting reports about the need for vitamin E and how much is enough, a new analysis suggests adequate levels of E are critical for our first 3 years, for the elderly, and for women who are or may become pregnant.

Sept 22, 2014------News ArchiveLatest research covered daily, archived weekly

Prenatal alcohol linked to mental health problems
Children whose mothers drank four units of alcohol while pregnant, even once, were more likely to suffer from hyperactivity. These research findings have reopened the debate about how much alcohol pregnant women can consume.

Sept 19, 2014------News ArchiveLatest research covered daily, archived weekly

Mechanism may fuel Downs babies in older moms
Dartmouth research on cell division has found a protein path that may explain molecular mistakes causing some women in their late 30's and older to have babies with Down syndrome.

Sept 18, 2014------News ArchiveLatest research covered daily, archived weekly

Infant's diet creates unique immune systems
Infant rhesus macaque monkeys receiving different diets early in life developed distinctly different immune systems that persisted for months after weaning.

Sept 17, 2014------News ArchiveLatest research covered daily, archived weekly

A molecular motor for human development
Addressing another mystery of the human body, scientists have identified how a molecular motor essential for human development works. They have also found how gene mutations linked to this motor can lead to a range of human diseases.

Sept 16, 2014------News ArchiveLatest research covered daily, archived weekly

Key to making new muscles
Researchers have developed a new technique to promote tissue repair in damaged muscles. The technique also creates a pool of muscle stem cells to support multiple rounds of muscle repair.

Sept 15, 2014------News ArchiveLatest research covered daily, archived weekly

Preemie apnea therapy has no long-term effects
Caffeine therapy, given for sleep apnea in premature infants, has no long-term harmful effects on sleep or their breathing control, according to a new study, the first in humans.

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